Oral creatine supplementation does not improve body composition in recreationally active men during strength training

S. D. Ball, J. Bowen-Thwaits, Pamela Swan

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    The effects of oral creatine supplementation (CR) on body mass (BM), percent body fat (BF), fat mass (FM), and fat free mass (FFM) were examined. A double blind, crossover design compared 10 recreationally active college-aged men during a 10-week strength-training program. Five men were randomly assigned either 20 g creatine/day or 20 g/day of maltodextrine (PL) for five days, followed by a maintenance dose of 2 g/day for three weeks. Treatments were separated by a four-week washout period while training continued. Body composition was determined using whole body plethysmography (Bod Pod®). BM increased (1.52±1.76 kg) (P=0.028) following CR compared to PL. FFM increased (P<0.05) in both CR (1.93±2.61 kg) and PL (2.24±2.10 kg) whereas FM and BF decreased (P<0.018) following PL but not CR (FM -2.60±2.37 kg; BF -3.22±2.88 %). In conclusion, CR significantly increased BM, without lowering BF and did not increase FFM greater than strength training alone.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)9-15
    Number of pages7
    JournalJournal of Exercise Physiology Online
    Volume7
    Issue number6
    StatePublished - Dec 1 2004

    Keywords

    • Body density
    • Body mass gain
    • Fat loss

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Physiology (medical)

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