Oral and Hand Movement Speeds are Associated with Expressive Language Ability in Children with Speech Sound Disorder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study tested the hypothesis that children with speech sound disorder have generalized slowed motor speeds. It evaluated associations among oral and hand motor speeds and measures of speech (articulation and phonology) and language (receptive vocabulary, sentence comprehension, sentence imitation), in 11 children with moderate to severe SSD and 11 controls. Syllable durations from a syllable repetition task served as an estimate of maximal oral movement speed. In two imitation tasks, nonwords and clapped rhythms, unstressed vowel durations and quarter-note clap intervals served as estimates of oral and hand movement speed, respectively. Syllable durations were significantly correlated with vowel durations and hand clap intervals. Sentence imitation was correlated with all three timed movement measures. Clustering on syllable repetition durations produced three clusters that also differed in sentence imitation scores. Results are consistent with limited movement speeds across motor systems and SSD subtypes defined by motor speeds as a corollary of expressive language abilities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)455-474
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Psycholinguistic Research
Volume41
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Central rate limit
  • Language impairment
  • Motor speed
  • Speech sound disorder

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Psychology(all)
  • Linguistics and Language

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