Optimizing retention basin networks

Quentin B. Travis, Larry Mays

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Retention basins are an effective and common means of flood control. Differing from detention, retention fully contains a particular storm event, using infiltration as the primary means of disposal. For a complex watershed with multiple subwatersheds; however, requiring basins to retain only flow from their contributing subwatershed may result in a suboptimal solution both in terms of cost and overall flood control. This paper introduces a design procedure for considering location and sizing of a network of retention basins within a watershed. It utilizes the discrete dynamic programming technique to determine the ideal locations and geometry for each basin. A design example demonstrates that this method may allow significant cost savings over traditional methods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)432-439
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Water Resources Planning and Management
Volume134
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2008

Fingerprint

Flood control
Watersheds
Catchments
natural disaster
flood control
subversion
costs
Dynamic programming
Infiltration
basin
savings
Costs
programming
mathematics
watershed
Geometry
event
cost
infiltration
geometry

Keywords

  • Floods
  • Optimization
  • Retention basins
  • Routing
  • Storm water management
  • Water management
  • Watersheds

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Water Science and Technology
  • Civil and Structural Engineering

Cite this

Optimizing retention basin networks. / Travis, Quentin B.; Mays, Larry.

In: Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management, Vol. 134, No. 5, 09.2008, p. 432-439.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Travis, Quentin B. ; Mays, Larry. / Optimizing retention basin networks. In: Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management. 2008 ; Vol. 134, No. 5. pp. 432-439.
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