Optimization of intentional mistuning patterns for the reduction of the forced response effects of unintentional mistuning: Formulation and assessment

B. K. Choi, J. Lentz, A. J. Rivas-Guerra, Marc Mignolet

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

57 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The focus of present investigation on use of mistuning of bladed disks to reduce their sensitivity to unintentional random mistuning. The class of intentionally mistuned disks considered here is limited, for cost reasons, to arrangements of two types of blades (A and B, say). A two-step procedure is then described to optimize the arrangement of these blades around the disk to reduce the effects of unintentional mistuning. First, a pure optimization effort is undertaken to obtain the pattern(s) of the A and B blades that yields small/the smallest value of the largest amplitude of response to a given excitation in the absence of unintentional mistuning. Then, in the second step, a pattern screening technique based on a recently introduced measure of localization is used to determine which of the patterns does have a large/small sensitivity to random unintentional mistuning. In this manner, expensive Monte Carlo simulations can be eliminated. Examples of application involving both simple bladed disk models and a 17-blade industrial rotor clearly demonstrate the significant benefits of using this class of intentionally mistuned disks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)131-140
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power
Volume125
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2003

Fingerprint

Turbomachine blades
Screening
Rotors
Costs
Monte Carlo simulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

@article{986e8b66a626484ba0c9237197d47047,
title = "Optimization of intentional mistuning patterns for the reduction of the forced response effects of unintentional mistuning: Formulation and assessment",
abstract = "The focus of present investigation on use of mistuning of bladed disks to reduce their sensitivity to unintentional random mistuning. The class of intentionally mistuned disks considered here is limited, for cost reasons, to arrangements of two types of blades (A and B, say). A two-step procedure is then described to optimize the arrangement of these blades around the disk to reduce the effects of unintentional mistuning. First, a pure optimization effort is undertaken to obtain the pattern(s) of the A and B blades that yields small/the smallest value of the largest amplitude of response to a given excitation in the absence of unintentional mistuning. Then, in the second step, a pattern screening technique based on a recently introduced measure of localization is used to determine which of the patterns does have a large/small sensitivity to random unintentional mistuning. In this manner, expensive Monte Carlo simulations can be eliminated. Examples of application involving both simple bladed disk models and a 17-blade industrial rotor clearly demonstrate the significant benefits of using this class of intentionally mistuned disks.",
author = "Choi, {B. K.} and J. Lentz and Rivas-Guerra, {A. J.} and Marc Mignolet",
year = "2003",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1115/1.1498270",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "125",
pages = "131--140",
journal = "Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power",
issn = "0742-4795",
publisher = "American Society of Mechanical Engineers(ASME)",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Optimization of intentional mistuning patterns for the reduction of the forced response effects of unintentional mistuning

T2 - Formulation and assessment

AU - Choi, B. K.

AU - Lentz, J.

AU - Rivas-Guerra, A. J.

AU - Mignolet, Marc

PY - 2003/1

Y1 - 2003/1

N2 - The focus of present investigation on use of mistuning of bladed disks to reduce their sensitivity to unintentional random mistuning. The class of intentionally mistuned disks considered here is limited, for cost reasons, to arrangements of two types of blades (A and B, say). A two-step procedure is then described to optimize the arrangement of these blades around the disk to reduce the effects of unintentional mistuning. First, a pure optimization effort is undertaken to obtain the pattern(s) of the A and B blades that yields small/the smallest value of the largest amplitude of response to a given excitation in the absence of unintentional mistuning. Then, in the second step, a pattern screening technique based on a recently introduced measure of localization is used to determine which of the patterns does have a large/small sensitivity to random unintentional mistuning. In this manner, expensive Monte Carlo simulations can be eliminated. Examples of application involving both simple bladed disk models and a 17-blade industrial rotor clearly demonstrate the significant benefits of using this class of intentionally mistuned disks.

AB - The focus of present investigation on use of mistuning of bladed disks to reduce their sensitivity to unintentional random mistuning. The class of intentionally mistuned disks considered here is limited, for cost reasons, to arrangements of two types of blades (A and B, say). A two-step procedure is then described to optimize the arrangement of these blades around the disk to reduce the effects of unintentional mistuning. First, a pure optimization effort is undertaken to obtain the pattern(s) of the A and B blades that yields small/the smallest value of the largest amplitude of response to a given excitation in the absence of unintentional mistuning. Then, in the second step, a pattern screening technique based on a recently introduced measure of localization is used to determine which of the patterns does have a large/small sensitivity to random unintentional mistuning. In this manner, expensive Monte Carlo simulations can be eliminated. Examples of application involving both simple bladed disk models and a 17-blade industrial rotor clearly demonstrate the significant benefits of using this class of intentionally mistuned disks.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0141588005&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0141588005&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1115/1.1498270

DO - 10.1115/1.1498270

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0141588005

VL - 125

SP - 131

EP - 140

JO - Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power

JF - Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power

SN - 0742-4795

IS - 1

ER -