Optimal capacity conversion for product transitions under high service requirements

Hongmin Li, Stephen C. Graves, Woonghee Tim Huh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We consider the capacity planning problem during a product transition in which demand for a newgeneration product gradually replaces that for the old product. Capacity for the new product can be acquired both by purchasing new production lines and by converting existing production lines for the old product. Furthermore, in either case, the new product capacity is "retrofitted" to be flexible, i.e., to be able to also produce the old product. This capacity planning problem arises regularly at Intel, which served as the motivating context for this research. We formulate a two-product capacity planning model to determine the equipment purchase and conversion schedule, considering (i) time-varying and uncertain demand, (ii) dedicated and flexible capacity, (iii) inventory and equipment costs, and (iv) a chance-constrained service-level requirement. We develop a solution approach that accounts for the risk-pooling benefit of flexible capacity (a closed-loop planning approach) and compare it with a solution that is similar to Intel's current practice (an open-loop planning approach). We evaluate both approaches with a realistic but disguised example and show that the closed-loop planning solution leads to savings in both equipment and inventory costs and matches more closely the servicelevel targets for the two products. Our numerical experiments illuminate the cost trade-offs between purchasing new capacity and converting old capacity and between a level capacity plan versus a chase capacity plan.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)46-60
Number of pages15
JournalManufacturing and Service Operations Management
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2014

Fingerprint

Optimal capacity
Planning
Capacity planning
Costs
Purchasing
New products
Production line
Uncertain demand
Savings
Numerical experiment
Purchase
Trade-offs
Service levels
Inventory cost
Time-varying demand
Schedule
Risk pooling

Keywords

  • Capacity planning
  • Equipment conversion
  • Flexible capacity
  • Product transition
  • Risk pooling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Strategy and Management
  • Management Science and Operations Research

Cite this

Optimal capacity conversion for product transitions under high service requirements. / Li, Hongmin; Graves, Stephen C.; Huh, Woonghee Tim.

In: Manufacturing and Service Operations Management, Vol. 16, No. 1, 12.2014, p. 46-60.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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