Open knowledge management

Lessons from the open source revolution

Yukika Awazu, Kevin C. Desouza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

One might argue that the future of knowledge work is manifested in how open-source communities work. Knowledge work, as argued by Drucker (1968); Davenport, Thomas, and Cantrell (2002); and others, is comprised of specialists who collaborate via exchange of know-how and skills to develop products and services. This is exactly what an open-source community does. To this end, in this brief communication we conduct an examination of open-source communities and generate insights on how to augment current knowledge management practices in organizations. The goal is to entice scholars to transform closed knowledge management agendas that exist in organizations to ones that are representative of the open-source revolution.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1016-1019
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology
Volume55
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

knowledge work
Knowledge management
knowledge management
community work
know how
community
examination
communication
Communication
Open source
Knowledge work

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Information Systems
  • Library and Information Sciences

Cite this

Open knowledge management : Lessons from the open source revolution. / Awazu, Yukika; Desouza, Kevin C.

In: Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, Vol. 55, No. 11, 09.2004, p. 1016-1019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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