Online racial discrimination and the protective function of ethnic identity and self-esteem for african american adolescents

Brendesha M. Tynes, Adriana J. Umaña-Taylor, Chad A. Rose, Johnny Lin, Carolyn J. Anderson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A growing body of literature has shown that being victimized online is associated with poor mental health. Little is known about the factors that protect youth from the negative outcomes that may result from these victimization experiences, particularly those related to race. Using a risk and resilience framework, this study examined the protective function of ethnic identity and self-esteem among African Americans who experience online racial discrimination. For the sample of 125 adolescents, hierarchical regression results revealed that higher levels of ethnic identity and self-esteem significantly moderated the negative impact of online racial discrimination on anxiety levels. These findings show that ethnic identity and self-esteem can buffer the negative mental health outcomes associated with online racial discrimination, at least with respect to adolescents' anxiety. Findings from the current study have significant implications for adolescent adjustment given the increased time youth spend doing online activities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)343-355
Number of pages13
JournalDevelopmental Psychology
Volume48
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2012

Fingerprint

Racism
ethnic identity
Self Concept
African Americans
racism
self-esteem
adolescent
mental health
anxiety
Mental Health
victimization
Anxiety
resilience
experience
Social Adjustment
Crime Victims
regression
Buffers
American

Keywords

  • Ethnic identity
  • Internet
  • Online racial discrimination
  • Protective factor
  • Self-esteem

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies
  • Demography

Cite this

Online racial discrimination and the protective function of ethnic identity and self-esteem for african american adolescents. / Tynes, Brendesha M.; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J.; Rose, Chad A.; Lin, Johnny; Anderson, Carolyn J.

In: Developmental Psychology, Vol. 48, No. 2, 03.2012, p. 343-355.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tynes, Brendesha M. ; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J. ; Rose, Chad A. ; Lin, Johnny ; Anderson, Carolyn J. / Online racial discrimination and the protective function of ethnic identity and self-esteem for african american adolescents. In: Developmental Psychology. 2012 ; Vol. 48, No. 2. pp. 343-355.
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