On the waters upstream of Nares Strait, Arctic Ocean, from 1991 to 2012

Jennifer M. Jackson, Camille Lique, Matthew Alkire, Michael Steele, Craig M. Lee, William M. Smethie, Peter Schlosser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Lincoln Sea is a bifurcation point, where waters from the Canadian and Eurasian Basins flow to Nares or Fram Strait. Mechanisms that control which waters are found in the Lincoln Sea, and on its continental shelves, are unknown. Using conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD; from hydrographic and ice-tethered profiler surveys), nutrient, and mooring data with the DRAKKAR global 3-D coupled ocean/sea-ice model, the Lincoln Sea was examined from 1991 to 2012. Although both Pacific and Atlantic waters were observed on the North Ellesmere and North Greenland shelves, Atlantic water was shallower on the North Greenland shelf. Thus, deeper than 125m, water was warmer and saltier on the North Greenland shelf than the North Ellesmere shelf. Three different water types were identified on the North Ellesmere shelf - waters from the Canadian Basin were observed 1992, 1993, 1996, 2005, and 2012, waters from both the Canadian and Eurasian Basins were observed in 2003, 2004, and 2008, and waters with no temperature minima or maxima below the surface mixed layer were observed in 1991, 2006, 2009, and 2010. Mixing with vertical advection speeds of 1×10-4ms-1 were observed on the continental slope and this mixing could cause the disappearance of the temperature maxima. Model results suggest that currents on the North Ellesmere shelf were weak (less than 10cms-1), baroclinic, and directed away from Nares Strait while currents on the North Greenland shelf were stronger (less than 15cms-1), and primarily directed towards Nares Strait. CTD, mooring, and model results suggest that the water advected to Nares Strait is primarily from the North Greenland shelf while water on the North Ellesmere shelf is advected westward.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)83-96
Number of pages14
JournalContinental Shelf Research
Volume73
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Greenland
strait
Arctic region
basins
water
ice
temperature
basin
oceans
Arctic Ocean
profiler
bifurcation
warm water
continental slope
nutrients
mixed layer
sea ice
continental shelf
surface layer
advection

Keywords

  • Arctic Ocean
  • Lincoln Sea
  • Nares Strait
  • Ocean circulation
  • Water mass modification

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oceanography
  • Aquatic Science
  • Geology

Cite this

On the waters upstream of Nares Strait, Arctic Ocean, from 1991 to 2012. / Jackson, Jennifer M.; Lique, Camille; Alkire, Matthew; Steele, Michael; Lee, Craig M.; Smethie, William M.; Schlosser, Peter.

In: Continental Shelf Research, Vol. 73, 01.02.2014, p. 83-96.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jackson JM, Lique C, Alkire M, Steele M, Lee CM, Smethie WM et al. On the waters upstream of Nares Strait, Arctic Ocean, from 1991 to 2012. Continental Shelf Research. 2014 Feb 1;73:83-96. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.csr.2013.11.025
Jackson, Jennifer M. ; Lique, Camille ; Alkire, Matthew ; Steele, Michael ; Lee, Craig M. ; Smethie, William M. ; Schlosser, Peter. / On the waters upstream of Nares Strait, Arctic Ocean, from 1991 to 2012. In: Continental Shelf Research. 2014 ; Vol. 73. pp. 83-96.
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AB - The Lincoln Sea is a bifurcation point, where waters from the Canadian and Eurasian Basins flow to Nares or Fram Strait. Mechanisms that control which waters are found in the Lincoln Sea, and on its continental shelves, are unknown. Using conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD; from hydrographic and ice-tethered profiler surveys), nutrient, and mooring data with the DRAKKAR global 3-D coupled ocean/sea-ice model, the Lincoln Sea was examined from 1991 to 2012. Although both Pacific and Atlantic waters were observed on the North Ellesmere and North Greenland shelves, Atlantic water was shallower on the North Greenland shelf. Thus, deeper than 125m, water was warmer and saltier on the North Greenland shelf than the North Ellesmere shelf. Three different water types were identified on the North Ellesmere shelf - waters from the Canadian Basin were observed 1992, 1993, 1996, 2005, and 2012, waters from both the Canadian and Eurasian Basins were observed in 2003, 2004, and 2008, and waters with no temperature minima or maxima below the surface mixed layer were observed in 1991, 2006, 2009, and 2010. Mixing with vertical advection speeds of 1×10-4ms-1 were observed on the continental slope and this mixing could cause the disappearance of the temperature maxima. Model results suggest that currents on the North Ellesmere shelf were weak (less than 10cms-1), baroclinic, and directed away from Nares Strait while currents on the North Greenland shelf were stronger (less than 15cms-1), and primarily directed towards Nares Strait. CTD, mooring, and model results suggest that the water advected to Nares Strait is primarily from the North Greenland shelf while water on the North Ellesmere shelf is advected westward.

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