On modeling random topology power grids for testing decentralized network control strategies

Zhifang Wang, Anna Scaglione, Robert J. Thomas

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An electrical power grid is a critical infrastructure. Its reliable, robust, and efficient operationinevitably depends on underlying telecommunication networks. In order to design an efficient communication scheme and examine the efficiency of any networked control architecture, we need to characterize statistically its information source, namely the power grid itself. In this paper we studied both the topological and electrical characteristics of power grid networks based on a number of synthetic and real-world power systems. We made several interesting discoveries: the power grids are sparsely connected and the average nodal degree is very stable regardless of network size; the nodal degrees distribution has exponential tails, which can be approximated with a shifted Geometric distribution; the algebraic connectivity scales as a power function of network size with the power index lying between that of one-dimensional and two-dimensional lattice; the line impedance has a heavy-tailed distribution, which can be captured quite accurately by a Double Pareto LogNormal distribution. Based on the discoveries mentioned above, we propose an algorithm that generates random power grids featuring the same topology and electrical characteristics we found from the real data.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationIFAC Proceedings Volumes (IFAC-PapersOnline)
Pages114-119
Number of pages6
Volume1
EditionPART 1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes
Event1st IFAC Workshop on Estimation and Control of Networked Systems, NecSys'09 - Venice, Italy
Duration: Sep 24 2009Sep 26 2009

Other

Other1st IFAC Workshop on Estimation and Control of Networked Systems, NecSys'09
CountryItaly
CityVenice
Period9/24/099/26/09

Fingerprint

Critical infrastructures
Telecommunication networks
Topology
Communication
Testing

Keywords

  • Graph models for networks
  • Power grid topology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Control and Systems Engineering

Cite this

Wang, Z., Scaglione, A., & Thomas, R. J. (2009). On modeling random topology power grids for testing decentralized network control strategies. In IFAC Proceedings Volumes (IFAC-PapersOnline) (PART 1 ed., Vol. 1, pp. 114-119) https://doi.org/10.3182/20090924-3-IT-4005.0011

On modeling random topology power grids for testing decentralized network control strategies. / Wang, Zhifang; Scaglione, Anna; Thomas, Robert J.

IFAC Proceedings Volumes (IFAC-PapersOnline). Vol. 1 PART 1. ed. 2009. p. 114-119.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Wang, Z, Scaglione, A & Thomas, RJ 2009, On modeling random topology power grids for testing decentralized network control strategies. in IFAC Proceedings Volumes (IFAC-PapersOnline). PART 1 edn, vol. 1, pp. 114-119, 1st IFAC Workshop on Estimation and Control of Networked Systems, NecSys'09, Venice, Italy, 9/24/09. https://doi.org/10.3182/20090924-3-IT-4005.0011
Wang Z, Scaglione A, Thomas RJ. On modeling random topology power grids for testing decentralized network control strategies. In IFAC Proceedings Volumes (IFAC-PapersOnline). PART 1 ed. Vol. 1. 2009. p. 114-119 https://doi.org/10.3182/20090924-3-IT-4005.0011
Wang, Zhifang ; Scaglione, Anna ; Thomas, Robert J. / On modeling random topology power grids for testing decentralized network control strategies. IFAC Proceedings Volumes (IFAC-PapersOnline). Vol. 1 PART 1. ed. 2009. pp. 114-119
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