Older adults' perceptions of intergenerational support after widowhood how do men and women differ?

Jung Hwa Ha, Deborah Carr, Rebecca L. Utz, Randolph Nesse

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

79 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examines the ways that widowhood affects older adults' perceived exchange of support with their children, and whether exchange patterns differ by gender. Data are from the Changing Lives of Older Couples (CLOC), a prospective study of 1,532 married individuals age 65 years and older. Spousal loss increases older adults' dependence on their children 6 months after the loss yet decreases children's dependence on their surviving parents. Patterns of postloss parent-child exchanges differ by gender of parent. Compared to widowers, widows are more dependent on their children for financial and/or legal advice yet provide more emotional and instrumental support. However, these gender differences are contingent on educational attainment. Education decreases widows' dependence on children for financial and legal advice yet increases widowers' provision of emotional support to their children. The findings suggest that adherence to traditional gender roles among married couples may influence older adults' adaptation to spousal loss.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3-30
Number of pages28
JournalJournal of Family Issues
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

legal advice
widower
parents
widow
married couple
gender
gender role
gender-specific factors
education

Keywords

  • Gender roles
  • Intergenerational exchange
  • Parent-child dependence
  • Widowhood

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Older adults' perceptions of intergenerational support after widowhood how do men and women differ? / Ha, Jung Hwa; Carr, Deborah; Utz, Rebecca L.; Nesse, Randolph.

In: Journal of Family Issues, Vol. 27, No. 1, 01.2006, p. 3-30.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{8cc9802b1a244aa7aecf041b790655dd,
title = "Older adults' perceptions of intergenerational support after widowhood how do men and women differ?",
abstract = "This study examines the ways that widowhood affects older adults' perceived exchange of support with their children, and whether exchange patterns differ by gender. Data are from the Changing Lives of Older Couples (CLOC), a prospective study of 1,532 married individuals age 65 years and older. Spousal loss increases older adults' dependence on their children 6 months after the loss yet decreases children's dependence on their surviving parents. Patterns of postloss parent-child exchanges differ by gender of parent. Compared to widowers, widows are more dependent on their children for financial and/or legal advice yet provide more emotional and instrumental support. However, these gender differences are contingent on educational attainment. Education decreases widows' dependence on children for financial and legal advice yet increases widowers' provision of emotional support to their children. The findings suggest that adherence to traditional gender roles among married couples may influence older adults' adaptation to spousal loss.",
keywords = "Gender roles, Intergenerational exchange, Parent-child dependence, Widowhood",
author = "Ha, {Jung Hwa} and Deborah Carr and Utz, {Rebecca L.} and Randolph Nesse",
year = "2006",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0192513X05277810",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "27",
pages = "3--30",
journal = "Journal of Family Issues",
issn = "0192-513X",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Older adults' perceptions of intergenerational support after widowhood how do men and women differ?

AU - Ha, Jung Hwa

AU - Carr, Deborah

AU - Utz, Rebecca L.

AU - Nesse, Randolph

PY - 2006/1

Y1 - 2006/1

N2 - This study examines the ways that widowhood affects older adults' perceived exchange of support with their children, and whether exchange patterns differ by gender. Data are from the Changing Lives of Older Couples (CLOC), a prospective study of 1,532 married individuals age 65 years and older. Spousal loss increases older adults' dependence on their children 6 months after the loss yet decreases children's dependence on their surviving parents. Patterns of postloss parent-child exchanges differ by gender of parent. Compared to widowers, widows are more dependent on their children for financial and/or legal advice yet provide more emotional and instrumental support. However, these gender differences are contingent on educational attainment. Education decreases widows' dependence on children for financial and legal advice yet increases widowers' provision of emotional support to their children. The findings suggest that adherence to traditional gender roles among married couples may influence older adults' adaptation to spousal loss.

AB - This study examines the ways that widowhood affects older adults' perceived exchange of support with their children, and whether exchange patterns differ by gender. Data are from the Changing Lives of Older Couples (CLOC), a prospective study of 1,532 married individuals age 65 years and older. Spousal loss increases older adults' dependence on their children 6 months after the loss yet decreases children's dependence on their surviving parents. Patterns of postloss parent-child exchanges differ by gender of parent. Compared to widowers, widows are more dependent on their children for financial and/or legal advice yet provide more emotional and instrumental support. However, these gender differences are contingent on educational attainment. Education decreases widows' dependence on children for financial and legal advice yet increases widowers' provision of emotional support to their children. The findings suggest that adherence to traditional gender roles among married couples may influence older adults' adaptation to spousal loss.

KW - Gender roles

KW - Intergenerational exchange

KW - Parent-child dependence

KW - Widowhood

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=30844448325&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=30844448325&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0192513X05277810

DO - 10.1177/0192513X05277810

M3 - Article

VL - 27

SP - 3

EP - 30

JO - Journal of Family Issues

JF - Journal of Family Issues

SN - 0192-513X

IS - 1

ER -