Offering incentives for new development: The role of city social status, politics, and local growth experiences

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

The propensity of municipal governments to offer incentives for new development is empirically examined, drawing upon both the literature on local economic development policy and studies of local residential restrictions. The data are from a 1998 mail survey of city managers in California in which officials assessed the likelihood that their local governments would offer financial assistance or zoning changes to various types of new business and residential land uses in their communities. Multivariate analysis indicates that local conditions resulting from past growth patterns-commuting times, job/ population balance, and housing affordability-play an important role in shaping respondents' assessments as to whether their cities are likely to grant incentives. Such factors deserve an important role in explaining local government growth orientations, alongside measures of community status, political institutions, and the strength of progrowth coalitions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)143-157
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Urban Affairs
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Urban Studies

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