ODD dimensions, ADHD, and callous-unemotional traits as predictors of treatment response in children with disruptive behavior disorders

David J. Kolko, Dustin A. Pardini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

117 Scopus citations

Abstract

To answer several questions pertinent to DSM-V, the authors examined the predictive validity of pretreatment oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) dimensions, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and callous-unemotional (CU) traits in relation to several treatment outcomes in 177 children diagnosed with ODD or conduct disorder (CD). Multiple informants completed diagnostic interviews and rating scales at 6 assessment points (pretreatment to 3-year follow-up) to document emotional and behavioral outcomes. After controlling for pretreatment CD, the ODD dimension of hurtfulness was related to treatment-resistant CD, delinquent behaviors, and externalizing problems. In contrast, the ODD dimension tapping irritability was associated with treatment-resistant ODD, internalizing problems, and global functional impairment following treatment. Whereas pretreatment ADHD was associated with posttreatment ODD and social problems, it was unrelated to posttreatment CD symptoms and diagnosis. Contrary to predictions, CU traits were unrelated to any posttreatment outcomes after controlling for other covariates. These findings remained after controlling for measures of pretreatment global functional impairment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)713-725
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Abnormal Psychology
Volume119
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Callous-unemotional
  • Conduct disorder
  • Longitudinal studies
  • Oppositional defiant disorder
  • Treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

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