Obtaining specimens with slowed, accelerated and reversed aging in the honey bee model

Daniel Münch, Nicholas Baker, Erik M.K. Rasmussen, Ashish K. Shah, Claus D. Kreibich, Lars E. Heidem, Gro Amdam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Societies of highly social animals feature vast lifespan differences between closely related individuals. Among social insects, the honey bee is the best established model to study how plasticity in lifespan and aging is explained by social factors. The worker caste of honey bees includes nurse bees, which tend the brood, and forager bees, which collect nectar and pollen. Previous work has shown that brain functions and flight performance senesce more rapidly in foragers than in nurses. However, brain functions can recover, when foragers revert back to nursing tasks. Such patterns of accelerated and reversed functional senescence are linked to changed metabolic resource levels, to alterations in protein abundance and to immune function. Vitellogenin, a yolk protein with adapted functions in hormonal control and cellular defense, may serve as a major regulatory element in a network that controls the different aging dynamics in workers. Here we describe how the emergence of nurses and foragers can be monitored, and manipulated, including the reversal from typically short-lived foragers into longer-lived nurses. Our representative results show how individuals with similar chronological age differentiate into foragers and nurse bees under experimental conditions. We exemplify how behavioral reversal from foragers back to nurses can be validated. Last, we show how different cellular senescence can be assessed by measuring the accumulation of lipofuscin, a universal biomarker of senescence. For studying mechanisms that may link social influences and aging plasticity, this protocol provides a standardized tool set to acquire relevant sample material, and to improve data comparability among future studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of visualized experiments : JoVE
Issue number78
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Honey
Bees
Aging of materials
Nurses
Plasticity
Brain
Plant Nectar
Proteins
Vitellogenins
Egg Proteins
Lipofuscin
Flight dynamics
Nursing
Biomarkers
Animals
Cell Aging
Pollen
Social Class
Insects

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Obtaining specimens with slowed, accelerated and reversed aging in the honey bee model. / Münch, Daniel; Baker, Nicholas; Rasmussen, Erik M.K.; Shah, Ashish K.; Kreibich, Claus D.; Heidem, Lars E.; Amdam, Gro.

In: Journal of visualized experiments : JoVE, No. 78, 2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Münch, Daniel ; Baker, Nicholas ; Rasmussen, Erik M.K. ; Shah, Ashish K. ; Kreibich, Claus D. ; Heidem, Lars E. ; Amdam, Gro. / Obtaining specimens with slowed, accelerated and reversed aging in the honey bee model. In: Journal of visualized experiments : JoVE. 2013 ; No. 78.
@article{76a354781cee40d4b576334c7459c407,
title = "Obtaining specimens with slowed, accelerated and reversed aging in the honey bee model",
abstract = "Societies of highly social animals feature vast lifespan differences between closely related individuals. Among social insects, the honey bee is the best established model to study how plasticity in lifespan and aging is explained by social factors. The worker caste of honey bees includes nurse bees, which tend the brood, and forager bees, which collect nectar and pollen. Previous work has shown that brain functions and flight performance senesce more rapidly in foragers than in nurses. However, brain functions can recover, when foragers revert back to nursing tasks. Such patterns of accelerated and reversed functional senescence are linked to changed metabolic resource levels, to alterations in protein abundance and to immune function. Vitellogenin, a yolk protein with adapted functions in hormonal control and cellular defense, may serve as a major regulatory element in a network that controls the different aging dynamics in workers. Here we describe how the emergence of nurses and foragers can be monitored, and manipulated, including the reversal from typically short-lived foragers into longer-lived nurses. Our representative results show how individuals with similar chronological age differentiate into foragers and nurse bees under experimental conditions. We exemplify how behavioral reversal from foragers back to nurses can be validated. Last, we show how different cellular senescence can be assessed by measuring the accumulation of lipofuscin, a universal biomarker of senescence. For studying mechanisms that may link social influences and aging plasticity, this protocol provides a standardized tool set to acquire relevant sample material, and to improve data comparability among future studies.",
author = "Daniel M{\"u}nch and Nicholas Baker and Rasmussen, {Erik M.K.} and Shah, {Ashish K.} and Kreibich, {Claus D.} and Heidem, {Lars E.} and Gro Amdam",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.3791/50550",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Journal of Visualized Experiments",
issn = "1940-087X",
publisher = "MYJoVE Corporation",
number = "78",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Obtaining specimens with slowed, accelerated and reversed aging in the honey bee model

AU - Münch, Daniel

AU - Baker, Nicholas

AU - Rasmussen, Erik M.K.

AU - Shah, Ashish K.

AU - Kreibich, Claus D.

AU - Heidem, Lars E.

AU - Amdam, Gro

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Societies of highly social animals feature vast lifespan differences between closely related individuals. Among social insects, the honey bee is the best established model to study how plasticity in lifespan and aging is explained by social factors. The worker caste of honey bees includes nurse bees, which tend the brood, and forager bees, which collect nectar and pollen. Previous work has shown that brain functions and flight performance senesce more rapidly in foragers than in nurses. However, brain functions can recover, when foragers revert back to nursing tasks. Such patterns of accelerated and reversed functional senescence are linked to changed metabolic resource levels, to alterations in protein abundance and to immune function. Vitellogenin, a yolk protein with adapted functions in hormonal control and cellular defense, may serve as a major regulatory element in a network that controls the different aging dynamics in workers. Here we describe how the emergence of nurses and foragers can be monitored, and manipulated, including the reversal from typically short-lived foragers into longer-lived nurses. Our representative results show how individuals with similar chronological age differentiate into foragers and nurse bees under experimental conditions. We exemplify how behavioral reversal from foragers back to nurses can be validated. Last, we show how different cellular senescence can be assessed by measuring the accumulation of lipofuscin, a universal biomarker of senescence. For studying mechanisms that may link social influences and aging plasticity, this protocol provides a standardized tool set to acquire relevant sample material, and to improve data comparability among future studies.

AB - Societies of highly social animals feature vast lifespan differences between closely related individuals. Among social insects, the honey bee is the best established model to study how plasticity in lifespan and aging is explained by social factors. The worker caste of honey bees includes nurse bees, which tend the brood, and forager bees, which collect nectar and pollen. Previous work has shown that brain functions and flight performance senesce more rapidly in foragers than in nurses. However, brain functions can recover, when foragers revert back to nursing tasks. Such patterns of accelerated and reversed functional senescence are linked to changed metabolic resource levels, to alterations in protein abundance and to immune function. Vitellogenin, a yolk protein with adapted functions in hormonal control and cellular defense, may serve as a major regulatory element in a network that controls the different aging dynamics in workers. Here we describe how the emergence of nurses and foragers can be monitored, and manipulated, including the reversal from typically short-lived foragers into longer-lived nurses. Our representative results show how individuals with similar chronological age differentiate into foragers and nurse bees under experimental conditions. We exemplify how behavioral reversal from foragers back to nurses can be validated. Last, we show how different cellular senescence can be assessed by measuring the accumulation of lipofuscin, a universal biomarker of senescence. For studying mechanisms that may link social influences and aging plasticity, this protocol provides a standardized tool set to acquire relevant sample material, and to improve data comparability among future studies.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85003048655&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85003048655&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3791/50550

DO - 10.3791/50550

M3 - Article

C2 - 24022601

AN - SCOPUS:84883390887

JO - Journal of Visualized Experiments

JF - Journal of Visualized Experiments

SN - 1940-087X

IS - 78

ER -