Observed Family and Friendship Dynamics in Adolescence: a Latent Profile Approach to Identifying “Mesosystem” Adaptation for Intervention Tailoring

Thomas J. Dishion, Chung Jung Mun, Phuong Ha, Jenn-Yun Tein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nuanced understanding of adolescents’ interpersonal relationships with family and peers is important for developing more personalized interventions that prevent problem behaviors and adjustment issues. We used latent profile analysis (LPA) to classify a community sample of 784 adolescents with respect to their observed relationship dynamics with friends and family using videotaped observations and five-minute audiotaped speech samples collected at ages 16–17. The resulting latent classes served to predict behavioral and emotional health in early adulthood. The LPA of the video- and audio-coded observational variables revealed a three-class model: (1) the healthy relationship group (n = 587), representing low levels of deviant and drug use talk with friends and positive, noncoercive relationship with parents; (2) the disaffected group (n = 90), representing high levels of drug use talk with friends and negativity about their parent(s) in the five-minute speech sample; and (3) the antisocial group (n = 107), representing high levels of deviant talk, drug use talk, coercive joining with friends, and coerciveness in family interactions. In contrast to the healthy relationship group, the disaffected group showed elevated risk for substance use problems and depression and the antisocial group showed higher risk for substance use problems and committing violent crimes in early adulthood. Outcome differences between disaffected and antisocial groups were mostly nonsignificant. We discuss the viability of applying these findings to tailoring and personalizing family-based interventions with adolescents to address key dynamics in the family and friendship relationships to prevent adult substance use problems, depression, and violence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-15
Number of pages15
JournalPrevention Science
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jul 2 2018

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Family Relations
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Depression
Social Adjustment
Crime
Violence
Parents
Health

Keywords

  • Antisocial behaviors
  • Depression
  • Drug use
  • Intervention tailoring
  • Observation
  • Relationship dynamics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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title = "Observed Family and Friendship Dynamics in Adolescence: a Latent Profile Approach to Identifying “Mesosystem” Adaptation for Intervention Tailoring",
abstract = "Nuanced understanding of adolescents’ interpersonal relationships with family and peers is important for developing more personalized interventions that prevent problem behaviors and adjustment issues. We used latent profile analysis (LPA) to classify a community sample of 784 adolescents with respect to their observed relationship dynamics with friends and family using videotaped observations and five-minute audiotaped speech samples collected at ages 16–17. The resulting latent classes served to predict behavioral and emotional health in early adulthood. The LPA of the video- and audio-coded observational variables revealed a three-class model: (1) the healthy relationship group (n = 587), representing low levels of deviant and drug use talk with friends and positive, noncoercive relationship with parents; (2) the disaffected group (n = 90), representing high levels of drug use talk with friends and negativity about their parent(s) in the five-minute speech sample; and (3) the antisocial group (n = 107), representing high levels of deviant talk, drug use talk, coercive joining with friends, and coerciveness in family interactions. In contrast to the healthy relationship group, the disaffected group showed elevated risk for substance use problems and depression and the antisocial group showed higher risk for substance use problems and committing violent crimes in early adulthood. Outcome differences between disaffected and antisocial groups were mostly nonsignificant. We discuss the viability of applying these findings to tailoring and personalizing family-based interventions with adolescents to address key dynamics in the family and friendship relationships to prevent adult substance use problems, depression, and violence.",
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AU - Mun, Chung Jung

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AU - Tein, Jenn-Yun

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AB - Nuanced understanding of adolescents’ interpersonal relationships with family and peers is important for developing more personalized interventions that prevent problem behaviors and adjustment issues. We used latent profile analysis (LPA) to classify a community sample of 784 adolescents with respect to their observed relationship dynamics with friends and family using videotaped observations and five-minute audiotaped speech samples collected at ages 16–17. The resulting latent classes served to predict behavioral and emotional health in early adulthood. The LPA of the video- and audio-coded observational variables revealed a three-class model: (1) the healthy relationship group (n = 587), representing low levels of deviant and drug use talk with friends and positive, noncoercive relationship with parents; (2) the disaffected group (n = 90), representing high levels of drug use talk with friends and negativity about their parent(s) in the five-minute speech sample; and (3) the antisocial group (n = 107), representing high levels of deviant talk, drug use talk, coercive joining with friends, and coerciveness in family interactions. In contrast to the healthy relationship group, the disaffected group showed elevated risk for substance use problems and depression and the antisocial group showed higher risk for substance use problems and committing violent crimes in early adulthood. Outcome differences between disaffected and antisocial groups were mostly nonsignificant. We discuss the viability of applying these findings to tailoring and personalizing family-based interventions with adolescents to address key dynamics in the family and friendship relationships to prevent adult substance use problems, depression, and violence.

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