Observations of high-altitude CO2 hot bands in Mars by the orbiting Thermal Emission Spectrometer

W. C. Maguire, J. C. Pearl, M. D. Smith, B. J. Conrath, A. A. Kutepov, M. S. Kaelberer, E. Winter, Philip Christensen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We present limb spectral measurements of the Martian atmosphere for four seasonal periods produced from data acquired by the Mars Global Surveyor/Thermal Emission Spectrometer. Between the altitudes of approximately 50 and 90 km, nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) emission from CO2 hot bands is observed at 10 μm. The centroids of these emissions vary in latitude and height with season, and their emission regions extend approximately 120° in latitude. The emission is considerably stronger in the southern summer/northern winter season than in the corresponding northern summer/southern winter season due to large solar flux variations resulting from the eccentricity of the Martian orbit. Modeling of this emission explains its observed altitude, solar zenith angle, and seasonal dependence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1
Number of pages1
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research E: Planets
Volume107
Issue number9
StatePublished - Sep 25 2002

Fingerprint

thermal emission
high altitude
mars
Spectrometers
Mars
Orbits
spectrometer
Thermodynamics
spectrometers
Fluxes
winter
summer
Mars Global Surveyor
solar flux
zenith
thermodynamic equilibrium
Martian atmosphere
limbs
eccentricity
centroids

Keywords

  • Carbon dioxide
  • Hot band
  • MGS/TES
  • Non-LTE
  • Seasons limb

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Atmospheric Science
  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Geophysics
  • Oceanography
  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics

Cite this

Maguire, W. C., Pearl, J. C., Smith, M. D., Conrath, B. J., Kutepov, A. A., Kaelberer, M. S., ... Christensen, P. (2002). Observations of high-altitude CO2 hot bands in Mars by the orbiting Thermal Emission Spectrometer. Journal of Geophysical Research E: Planets, 107(9), 1.

Observations of high-altitude CO2 hot bands in Mars by the orbiting Thermal Emission Spectrometer. / Maguire, W. C.; Pearl, J. C.; Smith, M. D.; Conrath, B. J.; Kutepov, A. A.; Kaelberer, M. S.; Winter, E.; Christensen, Philip.

In: Journal of Geophysical Research E: Planets, Vol. 107, No. 9, 25.09.2002, p. 1.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Maguire, WC, Pearl, JC, Smith, MD, Conrath, BJ, Kutepov, AA, Kaelberer, MS, Winter, E & Christensen, P 2002, 'Observations of high-altitude CO2 hot bands in Mars by the orbiting Thermal Emission Spectrometer', Journal of Geophysical Research E: Planets, vol. 107, no. 9, pp. 1.
Maguire WC, Pearl JC, Smith MD, Conrath BJ, Kutepov AA, Kaelberer MS et al. Observations of high-altitude CO2 hot bands in Mars by the orbiting Thermal Emission Spectrometer. Journal of Geophysical Research E: Planets. 2002 Sep 25;107(9):1.
Maguire, W. C. ; Pearl, J. C. ; Smith, M. D. ; Conrath, B. J. ; Kutepov, A. A. ; Kaelberer, M. S. ; Winter, E. ; Christensen, Philip. / Observations of high-altitude CO2 hot bands in Mars by the orbiting Thermal Emission Spectrometer. In: Journal of Geophysical Research E: Planets. 2002 ; Vol. 107, No. 9. pp. 1.
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AB - We present limb spectral measurements of the Martian atmosphere for four seasonal periods produced from data acquired by the Mars Global Surveyor/Thermal Emission Spectrometer. Between the altitudes of approximately 50 and 90 km, nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) emission from CO2 hot bands is observed at 10 μm. The centroids of these emissions vary in latitude and height with season, and their emission regions extend approximately 120° in latitude. The emission is considerably stronger in the southern summer/northern winter season than in the corresponding northern summer/southern winter season due to large solar flux variations resulting from the eccentricity of the Martian orbit. Modeling of this emission explains its observed altitude, solar zenith angle, and seasonal dependence.

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