Object permanence in dogs: Invisible displacement in a rotation task

Holly C. Miller, Cassandra Gipson-Reichardt, Aubrey Vaughan, Rebecca Rayburn-Reeves, Thomas R. Zentall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dogs were tested for object permanence using an invisible displacement in which an object was hidden in one of two containers at either end of a beam and the beam was rotated. Consistent with earlier research, when the beam was rotated 180°, the dogs failed to find the object. However, when the beam was rotated only 90°, they were successful. Furthermore, when the dogs were led either 90° or 180° around the apparatus, they were also successful. In a control condition, when the dogs could not see the direction of the 90° rotation, they failed to find the object. The results suggest that the 180° rotation may produce an interfering context that can be reduced by rotating the apparatus only 90° or by changing the dogs' perspective. Once the conflict is eliminated, dogs show evidence of object permanence that includes invisibly displaced objects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)150-155
Number of pages6
JournalPsychonomic Bulletin and Review
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Dogs
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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

Cite this

Object permanence in dogs : Invisible displacement in a rotation task. / Miller, Holly C.; Gipson-Reichardt, Cassandra; Vaughan, Aubrey; Rayburn-Reeves, Rebecca; Zentall, Thomas R.

In: Psychonomic Bulletin and Review, Vol. 16, No. 1, 02.2009, p. 150-155.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Miller, Holly C. ; Gipson-Reichardt, Cassandra ; Vaughan, Aubrey ; Rayburn-Reeves, Rebecca ; Zentall, Thomas R. / Object permanence in dogs : Invisible displacement in a rotation task. In: Psychonomic Bulletin and Review. 2009 ; Vol. 16, No. 1. pp. 150-155.
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