Obesity and nutrient consumption: A rational addiction?

Timothy Richards, Paul M. Patterson, Abebayehu Tegene

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent research shows that the dramatic rise in obesity in the United States is due more to the overconsumption of unhealthy foods than underactivity. This study tests for an addiction to food nutrients as a potential explanation for the apparent excessive consumption. A random coefficients (mixed) logit model is used to test a multivariate rational addiction model. The results reveal a particularly strong addiction to carbohydrates. The implication of this finding is that price-based policies, sin taxes, or produce subsidies that change the expected future costs and benefits of consuming carbohydrate- intensive foods may be effective in controlling excessive nutrient intake.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)309-324
Number of pages16
JournalContemporary Economic Policy
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2007

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addiction
food
tax policy
subsidy
costs
Obesity
Rational addiction
Nutrients
Food
Addiction
Subsidies
Random coefficients
Costs and benefits
Mixed logit model
Nutrient intake
Tax

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Public Administration
  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)

Cite this

Obesity and nutrient consumption : A rational addiction? / Richards, Timothy; Patterson, Paul M.; Tegene, Abebayehu.

In: Contemporary Economic Policy, Vol. 25, No. 3, 07.2007, p. 309-324.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Richards, Timothy ; Patterson, Paul M. ; Tegene, Abebayehu. / Obesity and nutrient consumption : A rational addiction?. In: Contemporary Economic Policy. 2007 ; Vol. 25, No. 3. pp. 309-324.
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