Nuclear accidents, impact assessment, and disaster administration: post-chernobyl insights for agriculture in Canada

W. A. Kerr, B. D. Boutin, A. S. Kwaczek, S. Mooney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Although administrative procedures dealing with direct human health risks arising from a nuclear accident are in place in Canada, little thought has apparently been given to the administration of disaster policies when agricultural land would be affected. Evidence now emerging from Europe in the wake of Chernobyl suggests that major costs can arise from the disruption of agricultural production. The design and administration of the disaster policy can significantly affect the short-term costs associated with such a nuclear accident as well as the long-term productivity of the agricultural resource base. A specific case from the British Chernobyl experience is presented by way of example. Given the large amounts of data now becoming available from Europe, formal Canadian planning should be undertaken. As ultimate responsibility for compensation lies with the federal government, formal planning could provide for considerable savings to Canadian taxpayers in the event of a nuclear accident.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)387-400
Number of pages14
JournalEnvironmental Impact Assessment Review
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1992

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Ecology
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

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