Non-conscious activation of an elderly stereotype leads to safer driving behavior

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Under the guise of evaluating a head-up display in a driving simulator, participants completed scrambled sentence tasks (while waiting at stop signs) designed to prime an elderly stereotype. Driving speed and driving time between stop signs in this Elderly Stereotype condition were compared to a Control condition in which age non-specific words were substituted for elderly stereotyped words. Participants had a lower maximum speed and longer driving time in the Elderly Stereotype condition than in the Control condition. This effect was obtained even though the participants were completely unaware of the theme in the experimental condition. Theoretical, as well as applied implications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Pages1870-1874
Number of pages5
Volume3
StatePublished - 2008
Event52nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2008 - New York, NY, United States
Duration: Sep 22 2008Sep 26 2008

Other

Other52nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2008
CountryUnited States
CityNew York, NY
Period9/22/089/26/08

Fingerprint

traffic behavior
activation
stereotype
Chemical activation
Simulators
Display devices
time

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

Cite this

Branaghan, R., & Gray, R. (2008). Non-conscious activation of an elderly stereotype leads to safer driving behavior. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society (Vol. 3, pp. 1870-1874)

Non-conscious activation of an elderly stereotype leads to safer driving behavior. / Branaghan, Russell; Gray, Robert.

Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. Vol. 3 2008. p. 1870-1874.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Branaghan, R & Gray, R 2008, Non-conscious activation of an elderly stereotype leads to safer driving behavior. in Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. vol. 3, pp. 1870-1874, 52nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2008, New York, NY, United States, 9/22/08.
Branaghan R, Gray R. Non-conscious activation of an elderly stereotype leads to safer driving behavior. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. Vol. 3. 2008. p. 1870-1874
Branaghan, Russell ; Gray, Robert. / Non-conscious activation of an elderly stereotype leads to safer driving behavior. Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. Vol. 3 2008. pp. 1870-1874
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