New visions for engaged Buddhism: The Jungto Society and the Indra's Net Community movement in contemporary Korea

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7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper examines two major Buddhist movements in contemporary South Korea, the Jungto Society and Indra's Net Community, which address issues in daily lives of lay people. Visionary monks began these movements: Jungto was established by Pǒmnyun in 1988, and Indra's Net by Tobǒp in 1999. Both began as grassroots communities based on Buddhist principles, seeking an alternative way of thinking and living in response to contemporary society's emphasis on mass consumption, commercialism, competition, and the exploitation of the natural resources. While their activities overlap in promoting peace and ecological preservation, Jungto is better known for its humanitarian aid programmes in impoverished areas of the world, and the Indra's Net for its rural community movement in South Korea. With their steady and visible activities, these movements not only offer a new vision and work for lay Buddhists but also appeal to a wider population by involving the general public.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)27-46
Number of pages20
JournalContemporary Buddhism
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2010

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Engaged Buddhism
Indra
Korea
Buddhist
South Korea
Rural Communities
Natural Resources
Exploitation
Peace
Monks
General Public
Humanitarian Aid
Visible
Overlap
Daily Life
Commercialism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Religious studies
  • Philosophy

Cite this

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