Network and perceptual determinants of satisfaction among science and engineering faculty in US research universities

Eric Welch, Yamini Jha

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examines how personal research collaboration and advice networks of academic faculty in six fields of science and engineering affect three kinds of satisfaction: satisfaction with rewards; satisfaction with reputation of department and institution; and satisfaction with professional recognition and visibility of research. The study includes determinants found in the literature such as perceived influence on departmental decisions, departmental provision of resources, and perceptions of time spent on service and other controls. Using data collected from a national survey of academic faculty in six fields of science and engineering in Carnegie designated Research I universities, regression models test literature derived hypotheses. Findings show that the effects of network structure and resources on satisfaction depend on the kind of satisfaction studied. Non-network variables demonstrate associations with satisfaction that are generally expected from the literature. The paper provides evidence of the critical role that personal research collaboration and advice networks play for scientists’ satisfaction. It also raises important questions about the complex relationships between network structures and resources, and satisfaction. Conclusions present implications for university and departmental administrators.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Technology Transfer
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Feb 21 2015

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Visibility
University research
Network resources
Research collaboration
Network structure
Reward
Regression model
Resources

Keywords

  • Advice network
  • Collaboration network
  • Satisfaction
  • Science and engineering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business and International Management
  • Accounting
  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

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