Nanosecond fluorescence from chromatophores of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides and Rhodospirillum rubrum

Neal Woodbury, William W. Parson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Single-photon counting techniques were used to measure the fluorescence decay from Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides and Rhodospirillum rubrum chromatophores after excitation with a 25-ps, 600-nm laser pulse. Electron transfer was blocked beyond the initial radical-pair state (PF) by chemical reduction of the quinone that serves as the next electron acceptor. Under these conditions, the fluorescence decays with multiphasic kinetics and at least three exponential decay components are required to describe the delayed fluorescence. Weak magnetic fields cause a small increase in the decay time of the longest component. The components of the delayed fluorescence are similar to those found previously with isolated reaction centers. We interpret the multi-exponential decay in terms of two small (0.01-0.02 eV) relaxations in the free energy of PF, as suggested previously for reaction centers. From the initial amplitudes of the delayed fluorescence, it is possible to calculate the standard free-energy difference between the earliest resolved form of PF and the excited singlet state of the antenna complexes in R. rubrum strains S1 and G9. The free-energy gap is found to be about 0.10 eV. It also is possible to calculate the standard free-energy difference between PF and the excited singlet state of the reaction center bacteriochlorophyll dimer (P*). Values of 0.17 to 0.19 eV were found in both R. rubrum strains and also in Rps. sphaeroides strain 2.4.1. This free-energy gap agrees well with the standard free-energy difference between PF and P* determined previously for reaction centers isolated from Rps. sphaeroides strain R26. The temperature dependence of the delayed fluorescence amplitudes between 180 K and 295 K is qualitatively different in isolated reaction centers and chromatophores. However, the temperature dependence of the calculated standard free-energy difference between P* and PF is similar in reaction centers and chromatophores of Rps. sphaeroides. The different temperature dependence of the fluorescence amplitudes in reaction centers and chromatophores arises because the free-energy difference between P* and the excited antenna is dominated by the entropy change associated with delocalization of the excitation in the antenna. We conclude that the state PF is similar in isolated reaction centers and in the intact photosynthetic membrane. Chromatophores from Rps. sphaeroides strain R-26 exhibit an anomalous fluorescence component that could reflect heterogeneity in their antenna.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)197-210
Number of pages14
JournalBBA - Bioenergetics
Volume850
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2 1986
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Chromatophores
Rhodospirillum rubrum
Rhodobacter sphaeroides
Free energy
Fluorescence
Antennas
Excited states
Temperature
Photosynthetic membranes
Energy gap
Electrons
Bacteriochlorophylls
Entropy
Magnetic Fields
Photons
Dimers
Laser pulses
Lasers
Magnetic fields
Kinetics

Keywords

  • (R. rubrum, Rps. sphaeroides)
  • Bacterial photosynthesis
  • Chromatophore
  • Fluorescence kinetics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Nanosecond fluorescence from chromatophores of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides and Rhodospirillum rubrum. / Woodbury, Neal; Parson, William W.

In: BBA - Bioenergetics, Vol. 850, No. 2, 02.07.1986, p. 197-210.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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N2 - Single-photon counting techniques were used to measure the fluorescence decay from Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides and Rhodospirillum rubrum chromatophores after excitation with a 25-ps, 600-nm laser pulse. Electron transfer was blocked beyond the initial radical-pair state (PF) by chemical reduction of the quinone that serves as the next electron acceptor. Under these conditions, the fluorescence decays with multiphasic kinetics and at least three exponential decay components are required to describe the delayed fluorescence. Weak magnetic fields cause a small increase in the decay time of the longest component. The components of the delayed fluorescence are similar to those found previously with isolated reaction centers. We interpret the multi-exponential decay in terms of two small (0.01-0.02 eV) relaxations in the free energy of PF, as suggested previously for reaction centers. From the initial amplitudes of the delayed fluorescence, it is possible to calculate the standard free-energy difference between the earliest resolved form of PF and the excited singlet state of the antenna complexes in R. rubrum strains S1 and G9. The free-energy gap is found to be about 0.10 eV. It also is possible to calculate the standard free-energy difference between PF and the excited singlet state of the reaction center bacteriochlorophyll dimer (P*). Values of 0.17 to 0.19 eV were found in both R. rubrum strains and also in Rps. sphaeroides strain 2.4.1. This free-energy gap agrees well with the standard free-energy difference between PF and P* determined previously for reaction centers isolated from Rps. sphaeroides strain R26. The temperature dependence of the delayed fluorescence amplitudes between 180 K and 295 K is qualitatively different in isolated reaction centers and chromatophores. However, the temperature dependence of the calculated standard free-energy difference between P* and PF is similar in reaction centers and chromatophores of Rps. sphaeroides. The different temperature dependence of the fluorescence amplitudes in reaction centers and chromatophores arises because the free-energy difference between P* and the excited antenna is dominated by the entropy change associated with delocalization of the excitation in the antenna. We conclude that the state PF is similar in isolated reaction centers and in the intact photosynthetic membrane. Chromatophores from Rps. sphaeroides strain R-26 exhibit an anomalous fluorescence component that could reflect heterogeneity in their antenna.

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KW - (R. rubrum, Rps. sphaeroides)

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KW - Chromatophore

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