Nannochloropsis sp. algae for use as biofuel: Analyzing a translog production function using data from multiple sites in the southwestern United States

Steven Archambault, Cara Meghan Starbuck Downes, Wayne Van Voorhies, Christopher A. Erickson, Peter Lammers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper investigates the production of Nannochloropsis sp. algae at five different sites located in the southwestern region of the United States. Studies of the economic viability of algae production typically calculate the Capital and Operating Expenses of stylized algal production firms with minimal understanding of the linkages between production and input variables that drive the costs being estimated. These results work towards filling this gap by estimating several production functions using real world data. Our dataset includes 10,316. days of algae growth, from which we generate 495 growth period observations. Particularly, the study analyzes the relationship between variation in input factors over a growth period and the resulting algae production measured by ash free dry weight. We carry out several multivariate econometric regression analyses. The variables photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), length of growth periods, and the growth of Nannochloropsis salina result in increased algae production. Algae production at the Texas AgriLife at Texas A&M University in Pecos, Texas, and Flour Bluff, Texas, resulted in higher algae production than the three sites in New Mexico. Increases in the initial algae inoculation levels and average precipitation consistently indicated a negative relationship with algae production in our model. These results should be useful for further studies aiming to connect real world algae production decisions with measures of costs and profitability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)124-131
Number of pages8
JournalAlgal Research
Volume6
Issue numberPB
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

algae
Nannochloropsis
Southwestern United States
production functions
biofuels
economic sustainability
econometrics
photosynthetically active radiation

Keywords

  • Algae
  • Biofuel
  • Econometrics
  • Nannochloropsis sp.
  • Production function
  • Translog

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science

Cite this

Nannochloropsis sp. algae for use as biofuel : Analyzing a translog production function using data from multiple sites in the southwestern United States. / Archambault, Steven; Starbuck Downes, Cara Meghan; Van Voorhies, Wayne; Erickson, Christopher A.; Lammers, Peter.

In: Algal Research, Vol. 6, No. PB, 01.10.2014, p. 124-131.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Archambault, Steven ; Starbuck Downes, Cara Meghan ; Van Voorhies, Wayne ; Erickson, Christopher A. ; Lammers, Peter. / Nannochloropsis sp. algae for use as biofuel : Analyzing a translog production function using data from multiple sites in the southwestern United States. In: Algal Research. 2014 ; Vol. 6, No. PB. pp. 124-131.
@article{55dfb9d40b804639bfa8152d91c8ce94,
title = "Nannochloropsis sp. algae for use as biofuel: Analyzing a translog production function using data from multiple sites in the southwestern United States",
abstract = "This paper investigates the production of Nannochloropsis sp. algae at five different sites located in the southwestern region of the United States. Studies of the economic viability of algae production typically calculate the Capital and Operating Expenses of stylized algal production firms with minimal understanding of the linkages between production and input variables that drive the costs being estimated. These results work towards filling this gap by estimating several production functions using real world data. Our dataset includes 10,316. days of algae growth, from which we generate 495 growth period observations. Particularly, the study analyzes the relationship between variation in input factors over a growth period and the resulting algae production measured by ash free dry weight. We carry out several multivariate econometric regression analyses. The variables photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), length of growth periods, and the growth of Nannochloropsis salina result in increased algae production. Algae production at the Texas AgriLife at Texas A&M University in Pecos, Texas, and Flour Bluff, Texas, resulted in higher algae production than the three sites in New Mexico. Increases in the initial algae inoculation levels and average precipitation consistently indicated a negative relationship with algae production in our model. These results should be useful for further studies aiming to connect real world algae production decisions with measures of costs and profitability.",
keywords = "Algae, Biofuel, Econometrics, Nannochloropsis sp., Production function, Translog",
author = "Steven Archambault and {Starbuck Downes}, {Cara Meghan} and {Van Voorhies}, Wayne and Erickson, {Christopher A.} and Peter Lammers",
year = "2014",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.algal.2014.10.005",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "6",
pages = "124--131",
journal = "Algal Research",
issn = "2211-9264",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",
number = "PB",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Nannochloropsis sp. algae for use as biofuel

T2 - Analyzing a translog production function using data from multiple sites in the southwestern United States

AU - Archambault, Steven

AU - Starbuck Downes, Cara Meghan

AU - Van Voorhies, Wayne

AU - Erickson, Christopher A.

AU - Lammers, Peter

PY - 2014/10/1

Y1 - 2014/10/1

N2 - This paper investigates the production of Nannochloropsis sp. algae at five different sites located in the southwestern region of the United States. Studies of the economic viability of algae production typically calculate the Capital and Operating Expenses of stylized algal production firms with minimal understanding of the linkages between production and input variables that drive the costs being estimated. These results work towards filling this gap by estimating several production functions using real world data. Our dataset includes 10,316. days of algae growth, from which we generate 495 growth period observations. Particularly, the study analyzes the relationship between variation in input factors over a growth period and the resulting algae production measured by ash free dry weight. We carry out several multivariate econometric regression analyses. The variables photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), length of growth periods, and the growth of Nannochloropsis salina result in increased algae production. Algae production at the Texas AgriLife at Texas A&M University in Pecos, Texas, and Flour Bluff, Texas, resulted in higher algae production than the three sites in New Mexico. Increases in the initial algae inoculation levels and average precipitation consistently indicated a negative relationship with algae production in our model. These results should be useful for further studies aiming to connect real world algae production decisions with measures of costs and profitability.

AB - This paper investigates the production of Nannochloropsis sp. algae at five different sites located in the southwestern region of the United States. Studies of the economic viability of algae production typically calculate the Capital and Operating Expenses of stylized algal production firms with minimal understanding of the linkages between production and input variables that drive the costs being estimated. These results work towards filling this gap by estimating several production functions using real world data. Our dataset includes 10,316. days of algae growth, from which we generate 495 growth period observations. Particularly, the study analyzes the relationship between variation in input factors over a growth period and the resulting algae production measured by ash free dry weight. We carry out several multivariate econometric regression analyses. The variables photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), length of growth periods, and the growth of Nannochloropsis salina result in increased algae production. Algae production at the Texas AgriLife at Texas A&M University in Pecos, Texas, and Flour Bluff, Texas, resulted in higher algae production than the three sites in New Mexico. Increases in the initial algae inoculation levels and average precipitation consistently indicated a negative relationship with algae production in our model. These results should be useful for further studies aiming to connect real world algae production decisions with measures of costs and profitability.

KW - Algae

KW - Biofuel

KW - Econometrics

KW - Nannochloropsis sp.

KW - Production function

KW - Translog

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84920571640&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84920571640&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.algal.2014.10.005

DO - 10.1016/j.algal.2014.10.005

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84920571640

VL - 6

SP - 124

EP - 131

JO - Algal Research

JF - Algal Research

SN - 2211-9264

IS - PB

ER -