Mutation rates as adaptations

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In order to better understand life, it is helpful to look beyond the envelop of life as we know it. A simple model of coevolution was implemented with the addition of a gene for the mutation rate of the individual. This allowed the mutation rate itself to evolve in a lineage. The model shows that when the individuals interact in a sort of zero-sum game, the lineages maintain relatively high mutation rates. However, when individuals engage in interactions that have greater consequences for one individual in the interaction than the other, lineages tend to evolve relatively low mutation rates. This model suggests that one possible cause for differential mutation rates across genes may be the coevolutionary pressure of the various forms of interactions with other genes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)339-348
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Theoretical Biology
Volume186
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 7 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Mutation Rate
Mutation
Genes
mutation
Gene
Interaction
Zero sum game
genes
Coevolution
coevolution
Sort
Model
Tend
Pressure
Life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Mutation rates as adaptations. / Maley, Carlo.

In: Journal of Theoretical Biology, Vol. 186, No. 3, 07.06.1997, p. 339-348.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Maley, Carlo. / Mutation rates as adaptations. In: Journal of Theoretical Biology. 1997 ; Vol. 186, No. 3. pp. 339-348.
@article{12dbd533e60e4c3090c91e49e0b49881,
title = "Mutation rates as adaptations",
abstract = "In order to better understand life, it is helpful to look beyond the envelop of life as we know it. A simple model of coevolution was implemented with the addition of a gene for the mutation rate of the individual. This allowed the mutation rate itself to evolve in a lineage. The model shows that when the individuals interact in a sort of zero-sum game, the lineages maintain relatively high mutation rates. However, when individuals engage in interactions that have greater consequences for one individual in the interaction than the other, lineages tend to evolve relatively low mutation rates. This model suggests that one possible cause for differential mutation rates across genes may be the coevolutionary pressure of the various forms of interactions with other genes.",
author = "Carlo Maley",
year = "1997",
month = "6",
day = "7",
doi = "10.1006/jtbi.1996.0362",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "186",
pages = "339--348",
journal = "Journal of Theoretical Biology",
issn = "0022-5193",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mutation rates as adaptations

AU - Maley, Carlo

PY - 1997/6/7

Y1 - 1997/6/7

N2 - In order to better understand life, it is helpful to look beyond the envelop of life as we know it. A simple model of coevolution was implemented with the addition of a gene for the mutation rate of the individual. This allowed the mutation rate itself to evolve in a lineage. The model shows that when the individuals interact in a sort of zero-sum game, the lineages maintain relatively high mutation rates. However, when individuals engage in interactions that have greater consequences for one individual in the interaction than the other, lineages tend to evolve relatively low mutation rates. This model suggests that one possible cause for differential mutation rates across genes may be the coevolutionary pressure of the various forms of interactions with other genes.

AB - In order to better understand life, it is helpful to look beyond the envelop of life as we know it. A simple model of coevolution was implemented with the addition of a gene for the mutation rate of the individual. This allowed the mutation rate itself to evolve in a lineage. The model shows that when the individuals interact in a sort of zero-sum game, the lineages maintain relatively high mutation rates. However, when individuals engage in interactions that have greater consequences for one individual in the interaction than the other, lineages tend to evolve relatively low mutation rates. This model suggests that one possible cause for differential mutation rates across genes may be the coevolutionary pressure of the various forms of interactions with other genes.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0031558026&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0031558026&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1006/jtbi.1996.0362

DO - 10.1006/jtbi.1996.0362

M3 - Article

VL - 186

SP - 339

EP - 348

JO - Journal of Theoretical Biology

JF - Journal of Theoretical Biology

SN - 0022-5193

IS - 3

ER -