Music intervention to prevent delirium among older patients admitted to a trauma intensive care unit and a trauma orthopaedic unit

Kari Johnson, Julie Fleury, Darya McClain

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Evaluate music listening for delirium prevention among patients admitted to a Trauma Intensive Care and Trauma Orthopaedic Unit. The Roy Adaptation Model provided the theoretical framework focusing on modifying contextual stimuli. Methods: Randomised controlled trial, 40 patients aged 55 and older. Intervention: Participants randomly assigned to receive music listening or usual care for 60 minutes, twice a day, over three days. Pre-recorded self-selected music using an iPod and headsets, with slow tempo, low pitch and simple repetitive rhythms to alter physiologic responses. Outcomes: Heart rate, respiratory rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, confusion assessment method. Results: Repeated measures ANOVA, F(4, 134) = 4.75, p =.001, suggested statistically significant differences in heart rate pre/post music listening, and F(1, 37) = 10.44, p =.003 in systolic blood pressure pre/post music listening. Post-hoc analysis reported changes at three time periods of statistical significance; (p =.010), (p =.005) and (p =.039) and a change in systolic blood pressure pre/post music listening; (p =.001) of statistical significance. All participants screened negative for delirium. Conclusion: Music addresses pathophysiologic mechanisms that contribute to delirium; neurotransmitter imbalance, inflammation and acute physiologic stressors. Music to prevent delirium is one of few that provide support in a critical care setting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalIntensive and Critical Care Nursing
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Delirium
Trauma Centers
Music
Orthopedics
Intensive Care Units
Wounds and Injuries
Blood Pressure
Critical Care
Heart Rate
Confusion
Respiratory Rate
Neurotransmitter Agents
Analysis of Variance
Theoretical Models
Randomized Controlled Trials
Inflammation

Keywords

  • Delirium
  • Diastolic pressure
  • Heart rate
  • Music listening
  • Neuroscience of music
  • Non-pharmacologic approach
  • Pharmacologic approach
  • Roy Adaptation Model
  • Systolic blood pressure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care

Cite this

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title = "Music intervention to prevent delirium among older patients admitted to a trauma intensive care unit and a trauma orthopaedic unit",
abstract = "Purpose: Evaluate music listening for delirium prevention among patients admitted to a Trauma Intensive Care and Trauma Orthopaedic Unit. The Roy Adaptation Model provided the theoretical framework focusing on modifying contextual stimuli. Methods: Randomised controlled trial, 40 patients aged 55 and older. Intervention: Participants randomly assigned to receive music listening or usual care for 60 minutes, twice a day, over three days. Pre-recorded self-selected music using an iPod and headsets, with slow tempo, low pitch and simple repetitive rhythms to alter physiologic responses. Outcomes: Heart rate, respiratory rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, confusion assessment method. Results: Repeated measures ANOVA, F(4, 134) = 4.75, p =.001, suggested statistically significant differences in heart rate pre/post music listening, and F(1, 37) = 10.44, p =.003 in systolic blood pressure pre/post music listening. Post-hoc analysis reported changes at three time periods of statistical significance; (p =.010), (p =.005) and (p =.039) and a change in systolic blood pressure pre/post music listening; (p =.001) of statistical significance. All participants screened negative for delirium. Conclusion: Music addresses pathophysiologic mechanisms that contribute to delirium; neurotransmitter imbalance, inflammation and acute physiologic stressors. Music to prevent delirium is one of few that provide support in a critical care setting.",
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AU - Fleury, Julie

AU - McClain, Darya

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N2 - Purpose: Evaluate music listening for delirium prevention among patients admitted to a Trauma Intensive Care and Trauma Orthopaedic Unit. The Roy Adaptation Model provided the theoretical framework focusing on modifying contextual stimuli. Methods: Randomised controlled trial, 40 patients aged 55 and older. Intervention: Participants randomly assigned to receive music listening or usual care for 60 minutes, twice a day, over three days. Pre-recorded self-selected music using an iPod and headsets, with slow tempo, low pitch and simple repetitive rhythms to alter physiologic responses. Outcomes: Heart rate, respiratory rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, confusion assessment method. Results: Repeated measures ANOVA, F(4, 134) = 4.75, p =.001, suggested statistically significant differences in heart rate pre/post music listening, and F(1, 37) = 10.44, p =.003 in systolic blood pressure pre/post music listening. Post-hoc analysis reported changes at three time periods of statistical significance; (p =.010), (p =.005) and (p =.039) and a change in systolic blood pressure pre/post music listening; (p =.001) of statistical significance. All participants screened negative for delirium. Conclusion: Music addresses pathophysiologic mechanisms that contribute to delirium; neurotransmitter imbalance, inflammation and acute physiologic stressors. Music to prevent delirium is one of few that provide support in a critical care setting.

AB - Purpose: Evaluate music listening for delirium prevention among patients admitted to a Trauma Intensive Care and Trauma Orthopaedic Unit. The Roy Adaptation Model provided the theoretical framework focusing on modifying contextual stimuli. Methods: Randomised controlled trial, 40 patients aged 55 and older. Intervention: Participants randomly assigned to receive music listening or usual care for 60 minutes, twice a day, over three days. Pre-recorded self-selected music using an iPod and headsets, with slow tempo, low pitch and simple repetitive rhythms to alter physiologic responses. Outcomes: Heart rate, respiratory rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, confusion assessment method. Results: Repeated measures ANOVA, F(4, 134) = 4.75, p =.001, suggested statistically significant differences in heart rate pre/post music listening, and F(1, 37) = 10.44, p =.003 in systolic blood pressure pre/post music listening. Post-hoc analysis reported changes at three time periods of statistical significance; (p =.010), (p =.005) and (p =.039) and a change in systolic blood pressure pre/post music listening; (p =.001) of statistical significance. All participants screened negative for delirium. Conclusion: Music addresses pathophysiologic mechanisms that contribute to delirium; neurotransmitter imbalance, inflammation and acute physiologic stressors. Music to prevent delirium is one of few that provide support in a critical care setting.

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