Multiple Residence and Cyclical Migration

A Life Course Perspective

Kevin McHugh, Timothy D. Hogan, Stephen K. Happel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

101 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As a result of restrictive time‐space bounds in viewing migration, surprisingly little is known about the tempos and rhythms of geographical mobility in America. We discuss limitations of the conventional definition of migration and develop a life course framework of multiple residence and cyclical migration. Results of an Arizona‐based case study reveal that multiple residence is common and more diverse than the annual influx of elderly snowbirds. Coming to grips with multiple residence and recurrent mobility in the United States represents a fundamental challenge in population and migration studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)251-267
Number of pages17
JournalProfessional Geographer
Volume47
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995

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Keywords

  • Arizona
  • cyclical migration
  • life course
  • multiple residence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Earth-Surface Processes

Cite this

Multiple Residence and Cyclical Migration : A Life Course Perspective. / McHugh, Kevin; Hogan, Timothy D.; Happel, Stephen K.

In: Professional Geographer, Vol. 47, No. 3, 1995, p. 251-267.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McHugh, Kevin ; Hogan, Timothy D. ; Happel, Stephen K. / Multiple Residence and Cyclical Migration : A Life Course Perspective. In: Professional Geographer. 1995 ; Vol. 47, No. 3. pp. 251-267.
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