mtDNA analysis of a prehistoric Oneota population: Implications for the peopling of the New World

Anne Stone, Mark Stoneking

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

196 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

mtDNA was successfully extracted from 108 individuals from the Norris Farms Oneota, a prehistoric Native American population, to compare the mtDNA diversity from a pre-Columbian population with contemporary Native American and Asian mtDNA lineages and to examine hypotheses about the peopling of the New World. Haplogroup and hypervariable region I sequence data indicate that the lineages from haplogroups A, B, C, and D are the most common among Native Americans but that they were not the only lineages brought into the New World from Asia. The mtDNA evidence does not support the three-wave hypothesis of migration into the New World but rather suggests a single 'wave' of people with considerable mtDNA diversity that exhibits a signature of expansion 23,000-37,000 years ago.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1153-1170
Number of pages18
JournalAmerican Journal of Human Genetics
Volume62
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1998
Externally publishedYes

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Mitochondrial DNA
North American Indians
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics

Cite this

mtDNA analysis of a prehistoric Oneota population : Implications for the peopling of the New World. / Stone, Anne; Stoneking, Mark.

In: American Journal of Human Genetics, Vol. 62, No. 5, 05.1998, p. 1153-1170.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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