Moving toward spiritual competency: Deconstructing religious stereotypes and spiritual prejudices in social work literature

David R. Hodge, Lisa M. Baughman, Julie A. Cummings

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Scopus citations

Abstract

In spite of growing interest in spirituality and religion, and the prominent position given to religion in social work's educational policies and ethical standards, no studies have explored the profession's level of spiritual sensitivity. Accordingly, we examined the visibility of faith groups and their characterizations in 71 influential social work textbooks. This study found that faith groups, in contrast to a number of comparison groups, were essentially invisible as populations worthy of students' direct attention. Further, when faith groups were discussed, they tended to be characterized in a biased, spiritually insensitive manner. To move toward spiritual competency, social work must increase the amount of material devoted to faith groups and ensure that they are depicted in a manner that is consistent with their worldviews.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)211-231
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Social Service Research
Volume32
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 28 2006
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Bias
  • Evangelical Christians
  • Muslims
  • Religion
  • Spirituality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science

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