Moving toward culturally competent practice with Muslims: Modifying cognitive therapy with Islamic tenets

David Hodge, Aneesah Nadir

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

57 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Relatively little information exists on the provision of culturally competent services to Muslims, in spite of the growing presence of this population in the United States. Consequently, the authors discuss a number of therapeutic approaches in light of their level of congruence with common Islamic values. Psychodynamic approaches, for example, may not be as congruent as cognitive approaches. Although cognitive therapy may be relatively consistent with Islamic values, the self-statements that are central to this modality are often packaged in secular terminology that is inconsistent with Islamic norms. To provide culturally relevant services, practitioners must unwrap the secular terminology used to express the underlying therapeutic precepts and then repackage the precepts in terminology that reflects Islamic teaching. The authors conclude by offering a number of examples to illustrate the construction of statements that reflect Islamic values.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)31-41
Number of pages11
JournalSocial Work
Volume53
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 2008

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technical language
Muslim
Values
Teaching

Keywords

  • Cognitive therapy
  • Cultural competence
  • Islam
  • Muslims
  • Spirituality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Moving toward culturally competent practice with Muslims : Modifying cognitive therapy with Islamic tenets. / Hodge, David; Nadir, Aneesah.

In: Social Work, Vol. 53, No. 1, 01.2008, p. 31-41.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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