Moving Toward a Technology Infusion Approach: Considerations for Teacher Preparation Programs

Teresa Foulger, Keith Wetzel, Ray Buss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Most colleges of education employ a standalone technology integration course as a part of their teacher preparation programs. But in a 2016 higher education brief associated with the National Educational Technology Plan, the U.S. Department of Education suggested this approach is limiting for teacher candidates and charged teacher educators to devise a better option. A program-deep and program-wide approach to address technology integration that our college calls “technology infusion” is embedded in courses where content and pedagogy were emphasized. Over the past seven years, we have learned that technology infusion requires viewing technology integration from a conceptual and developmental perspective, and considering this innovative approach from an organizational perspective. This is consistent with change theory that indicates coming up with an innovation is 20% of the effort, while implementing change accounts for the other 80% (Fullan, 2007). The conclusions in this paper are based on the compilation of findings from our research studies as well as recent reflective conversations related to lessons learned that might support others in the field who are interested in moving toward an infused approach. Included are literature we used to justify a technology infusion approach, factors that shaped the adoption of technology infusion in our college, and factors we believe other colleges should consider prior to launching a technology infusion effort. (Keywords: educational technology, technology infusion, technology integration, teacher preparation, TPACK).

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Digital Learning in Teacher Education
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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teacher
Educational technology
Education
educational technology
education
Launching
conversation
candidacy
Innovation
educator
innovation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Computer Science Applications

Cite this

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