Moving toward a more inclusive educational environment? A multi-sample exploration of religious discrimination as seen through the eyes of students from various faith traditions

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Abstract

This multi-sample study of master of social work students from various faith traditions (N=391) explores the extent to which religious discrimination is perceived to exist as a problem in social work education programs. No difference in perceptions emerged between religiously affiliated and nonaffiliated respondents. Evangelical Christians generally reported higher levels of discrimination than theologically liberal and mainline Christians. The confirmation of the second hypothesis suggests that professional attention may be needed to ensure compliance with the profession's ethical and educational standards, while the failure of the first hypothesis suggests that progress toward a more inclusive educational environment may be occurring.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)249-267
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Social Work Education
Volume42
Issue number2
StatePublished - Mar 2006

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faith
social work
discrimination
student
profession
education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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