Motor learning in people with Parkinson's disease: Implications for fall prevention across the disease spectrum

Serene S. Paul, Leland E. Dibble, Daniel Peterson

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    9 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background: Falls are a significant burden for people with Parkinson's disease (PD), however, individuals across the spectrum of disease severity respond differently to fall prevention interventions. Despite the multifactorial causes of falls in people with PD, recent work has provided insight into interventions that hold promise for fall prevention. Further, studies have begun to identify patient characteristics that may predict responsiveness to such interventions. Research question: We discuss (i) the postural motor learning abilities of people with mild versus severe PD that could affect their ability to benefit from fall prevention interventions, (ii) how people with different severity of PD respond to such interventions, and (iii) the practical considerations of providing effective fall prevention interventions for people with PD across the spectrum of disease severity. Methods: This narrative review consolidates recent work on postural motor learning and fall prevention rehabilitation involving exercise in people with PD. Results: People with PD are able to improve postural motor control through practice, enabling them to benefit from exercise which challenges their gait and balance to reduce falling. Worsening of axial and cognitive symptoms may result in diminished learning, and those with more severe PD may require fully supervised, high intensity programs to reduce falls. Significance: Understanding how people with PD across the spectrum of disease severity differ in their postural motor learning ability and response to different fall prevention interventions will enable researchers and clinicians to refine such interventions and their delivery to minimize falls and their negative sequelae in people with PD.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)311-319
    Number of pages9
    JournalGait and Posture
    Volume61
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Mar 1 2018

    Fingerprint

    Parkinson Disease
    Learning
    Aptitude
    Accidental Falls
    Exercise Therapy
    Neurobehavioral Manifestations
    Gait
    Research Personnel
    Exercise
    Research

    Keywords

    • Balance
    • Exercise
    • Falls
    • Gait
    • Parkinson disease
    • Postural motor learning

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Biophysics
    • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
    • Rehabilitation

    Cite this

    Motor learning in people with Parkinson's disease : Implications for fall prevention across the disease spectrum. / Paul, Serene S.; Dibble, Leland E.; Peterson, Daniel.

    In: Gait and Posture, Vol. 61, 01.03.2018, p. 311-319.

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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    abstract = "Background: Falls are a significant burden for people with Parkinson's disease (PD), however, individuals across the spectrum of disease severity respond differently to fall prevention interventions. Despite the multifactorial causes of falls in people with PD, recent work has provided insight into interventions that hold promise for fall prevention. Further, studies have begun to identify patient characteristics that may predict responsiveness to such interventions. Research question: We discuss (i) the postural motor learning abilities of people with mild versus severe PD that could affect their ability to benefit from fall prevention interventions, (ii) how people with different severity of PD respond to such interventions, and (iii) the practical considerations of providing effective fall prevention interventions for people with PD across the spectrum of disease severity. Methods: This narrative review consolidates recent work on postural motor learning and fall prevention rehabilitation involving exercise in people with PD. Results: People with PD are able to improve postural motor control through practice, enabling them to benefit from exercise which challenges their gait and balance to reduce falling. Worsening of axial and cognitive symptoms may result in diminished learning, and those with more severe PD may require fully supervised, high intensity programs to reduce falls. Significance: Understanding how people with PD across the spectrum of disease severity differ in their postural motor learning ability and response to different fall prevention interventions will enable researchers and clinicians to refine such interventions and their delivery to minimize falls and their negative sequelae in people with PD.",
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