Motives for initiating and continuing membership in a recreation-related voluntary association

Linda L. Caldwell, Kathleen Andereck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

74 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine motives for joining and continuing membership in a recreation-related voluntary association. The theoretical framework for this study was based on a three-category incentive typology. Data were obtained from 371 members of a voluntary association with a mail-back questionnaire. Results indicated that the most important reason for joining and continuing membership in the association was to contribute to society. The least important reason was for an incentive or material benefit. Shifts in importance in these reasons from joining to continuing were assessed, as were the influence of gender and income level.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)33-44
Number of pages12
JournalLeisure Sciences
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

recreation
incentive
typology
gender
income
questionnaire
Recreation
Incentives
society
material
Income level
Questionnaire
Theoretical framework

Keywords

  • Material benefits
  • Motives
  • Purposive benefits
  • Solidary benefits
  • Voluntary associations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Tourism, Leisure and Hospitality Management

Cite this

Motives for initiating and continuing membership in a recreation-related voluntary association. / Caldwell, Linda L.; Andereck, Kathleen.

In: Leisure Sciences, Vol. 16, No. 1, 01.01.1994, p. 33-44.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{b171ce599996424b920da1eb80085e2a,
title = "Motives for initiating and continuing membership in a recreation-related voluntary association",
abstract = "The purpose of this study was to examine motives for joining and continuing membership in a recreation-related voluntary association. The theoretical framework for this study was based on a three-category incentive typology. Data were obtained from 371 members of a voluntary association with a mail-back questionnaire. Results indicated that the most important reason for joining and continuing membership in the association was to contribute to society. The least important reason was for an incentive or material benefit. Shifts in importance in these reasons from joining to continuing were assessed, as were the influence of gender and income level.",
keywords = "Material benefits, Motives, Purposive benefits, Solidary benefits, Voluntary associations",
author = "Caldwell, {Linda L.} and Kathleen Andereck",
year = "1994",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/01490409409513215",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "16",
pages = "33--44",
journal = "Leisure Sciences",
issn = "0149-0400",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Motives for initiating and continuing membership in a recreation-related voluntary association

AU - Caldwell, Linda L.

AU - Andereck, Kathleen

PY - 1994/1/1

Y1 - 1994/1/1

N2 - The purpose of this study was to examine motives for joining and continuing membership in a recreation-related voluntary association. The theoretical framework for this study was based on a three-category incentive typology. Data were obtained from 371 members of a voluntary association with a mail-back questionnaire. Results indicated that the most important reason for joining and continuing membership in the association was to contribute to society. The least important reason was for an incentive or material benefit. Shifts in importance in these reasons from joining to continuing were assessed, as were the influence of gender and income level.

AB - The purpose of this study was to examine motives for joining and continuing membership in a recreation-related voluntary association. The theoretical framework for this study was based on a three-category incentive typology. Data were obtained from 371 members of a voluntary association with a mail-back questionnaire. Results indicated that the most important reason for joining and continuing membership in the association was to contribute to society. The least important reason was for an incentive or material benefit. Shifts in importance in these reasons from joining to continuing were assessed, as were the influence of gender and income level.

KW - Material benefits

KW - Motives

KW - Purposive benefits

KW - Solidary benefits

KW - Voluntary associations

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=21344479708&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=21344479708&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/01490409409513215

DO - 10.1080/01490409409513215

M3 - Article

VL - 16

SP - 33

EP - 44

JO - Leisure Sciences

JF - Leisure Sciences

SN - 0149-0400

IS - 1

ER -