Motivations for outdoor recreation participation: a cross-national analysis of Taiwan, Japan, and the United States

C. Yoshioka, S. Simpson, R. Virden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Leisure research comparing recreation behavior of people of different nations generally has been restricted to determining recreation patterns and frequency of recreation activities. This study goes beyond identifying recreation patterns to compare the motivations for recreation participation. Specifically it uses the recreation experience preference (REP) scale to compare the desired psychological benefits of outdoor recreation activities as perceived by university students in Taiwah, Japan, and the US. Results revealed that in the motivation variables of achievement, nature appreciation, solitude, family interaction, and fun/thrills, the Chinese students consistently considered such motivations less important than either the Americans or the Japanese. The Japanese considered achievement and nature appreciation to be more important than the other two groups, while the Americans ranked fun and thrills of higher importance. -Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)75-85
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Geographical Science
Volume16
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

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