Motivation, goal orientation, coaching, and training habits of women ultrarunners

Rhonna Z. Krouse, Lynda B. Ransdell, Shelley M. Lucas, Mary E. Pritchard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ultrarunners participate in running events that exceed the 26.2-mile marathon distance (e.g., 50k, 50-100 miles). Very little research exists on ultrarunners, especially women. This study is a descriptive study detailing the motivation, goal orientation, demographic characteristics (e.g., age, job demands, family structure), training habits (e.g., hours per week of training), and coach utilization of women ultrarunners. Participants (N = 344) were recruited via the Ultra List serve and 4 popular ultrarunning websites, and they completed a questionnaire on motivation, goal orientation, training, and coaching using Survey Monkey. General health orientation (mean ± SD) (4.71 ± 1.06) and psychological coping (4.71 ± 1.03) were the 2 strongest motivational factors. Participants were higher in task orientation (1.38 ± 0.68) (e.g., finishing the race or accomplishing various goals) than ego orientation (3.38 ± 1.01) (e.g., placing in the top 3 overall or beating an opponent). Women trained an average of 12.49 h·wk -1 and spent 64% of their time training alone. Training information came from their own experience, blogs, websites, and the Ultra List Serve. Over three-fourths of the participants (80%) did not use a coach because of cost and a perceived lack of necessity. Women ultrarunners in this study were task oriented, internally motivated, health, and financially conscious individuals. With additional information about women ultrarunners, coaches will be better prepared to work with this population and ultrarunners can improve their performance by learning about current participants' practices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2835-2842
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Volume25
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Habits
Motivation
Blogging
Ego
Health
Running
Haplorhini
Demography
Mentoring
Learning
Psychology
Costs and Cost Analysis
Research
Population
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Conditioning
  • Female distance runners
  • Female endurance athletes
  • Long-distance running
  • Ultraendurance events

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Motivation, goal orientation, coaching, and training habits of women ultrarunners. / Krouse, Rhonna Z.; Ransdell, Lynda B.; Lucas, Shelley M.; Pritchard, Mary E.

In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, Vol. 25, No. 10, 10.2011, p. 2835-2842.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Krouse, Rhonna Z. ; Ransdell, Lynda B. ; Lucas, Shelley M. ; Pritchard, Mary E. / Motivation, goal orientation, coaching, and training habits of women ultrarunners. In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. 2011 ; Vol. 25, No. 10. pp. 2835-2842.
@article{4d179a0f233d4a3da86537842f5f8371,
title = "Motivation, goal orientation, coaching, and training habits of women ultrarunners",
abstract = "Ultrarunners participate in running events that exceed the 26.2-mile marathon distance (e.g., 50k, 50-100 miles). Very little research exists on ultrarunners, especially women. This study is a descriptive study detailing the motivation, goal orientation, demographic characteristics (e.g., age, job demands, family structure), training habits (e.g., hours per week of training), and coach utilization of women ultrarunners. Participants (N = 344) were recruited via the Ultra List serve and 4 popular ultrarunning websites, and they completed a questionnaire on motivation, goal orientation, training, and coaching using Survey Monkey. General health orientation (mean ± SD) (4.71 ± 1.06) and psychological coping (4.71 ± 1.03) were the 2 strongest motivational factors. Participants were higher in task orientation (1.38 ± 0.68) (e.g., finishing the race or accomplishing various goals) than ego orientation (3.38 ± 1.01) (e.g., placing in the top 3 overall or beating an opponent). Women trained an average of 12.49 h·wk -1 and spent 64{\%} of their time training alone. Training information came from their own experience, blogs, websites, and the Ultra List Serve. Over three-fourths of the participants (80{\%}) did not use a coach because of cost and a perceived lack of necessity. Women ultrarunners in this study were task oriented, internally motivated, health, and financially conscious individuals. With additional information about women ultrarunners, coaches will be better prepared to work with this population and ultrarunners can improve their performance by learning about current participants' practices.",
keywords = "Conditioning, Female distance runners, Female endurance athletes, Long-distance running, Ultraendurance events",
author = "Krouse, {Rhonna Z.} and Ransdell, {Lynda B.} and Lucas, {Shelley M.} and Pritchard, {Mary E.}",
year = "2011",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1519/JSC.0b013e318204caa0",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "25",
pages = "2835--2842",
journal = "Strength and Conditioning Journal",
issn = "1524-1602",
publisher = "NSCA National Strength and Conditioning Association",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Motivation, goal orientation, coaching, and training habits of women ultrarunners

AU - Krouse, Rhonna Z.

AU - Ransdell, Lynda B.

AU - Lucas, Shelley M.

AU - Pritchard, Mary E.

PY - 2011/10

Y1 - 2011/10

N2 - Ultrarunners participate in running events that exceed the 26.2-mile marathon distance (e.g., 50k, 50-100 miles). Very little research exists on ultrarunners, especially women. This study is a descriptive study detailing the motivation, goal orientation, demographic characteristics (e.g., age, job demands, family structure), training habits (e.g., hours per week of training), and coach utilization of women ultrarunners. Participants (N = 344) were recruited via the Ultra List serve and 4 popular ultrarunning websites, and they completed a questionnaire on motivation, goal orientation, training, and coaching using Survey Monkey. General health orientation (mean ± SD) (4.71 ± 1.06) and psychological coping (4.71 ± 1.03) were the 2 strongest motivational factors. Participants were higher in task orientation (1.38 ± 0.68) (e.g., finishing the race or accomplishing various goals) than ego orientation (3.38 ± 1.01) (e.g., placing in the top 3 overall or beating an opponent). Women trained an average of 12.49 h·wk -1 and spent 64% of their time training alone. Training information came from their own experience, blogs, websites, and the Ultra List Serve. Over three-fourths of the participants (80%) did not use a coach because of cost and a perceived lack of necessity. Women ultrarunners in this study were task oriented, internally motivated, health, and financially conscious individuals. With additional information about women ultrarunners, coaches will be better prepared to work with this population and ultrarunners can improve their performance by learning about current participants' practices.

AB - Ultrarunners participate in running events that exceed the 26.2-mile marathon distance (e.g., 50k, 50-100 miles). Very little research exists on ultrarunners, especially women. This study is a descriptive study detailing the motivation, goal orientation, demographic characteristics (e.g., age, job demands, family structure), training habits (e.g., hours per week of training), and coach utilization of women ultrarunners. Participants (N = 344) were recruited via the Ultra List serve and 4 popular ultrarunning websites, and they completed a questionnaire on motivation, goal orientation, training, and coaching using Survey Monkey. General health orientation (mean ± SD) (4.71 ± 1.06) and psychological coping (4.71 ± 1.03) were the 2 strongest motivational factors. Participants were higher in task orientation (1.38 ± 0.68) (e.g., finishing the race or accomplishing various goals) than ego orientation (3.38 ± 1.01) (e.g., placing in the top 3 overall or beating an opponent). Women trained an average of 12.49 h·wk -1 and spent 64% of their time training alone. Training information came from their own experience, blogs, websites, and the Ultra List Serve. Over three-fourths of the participants (80%) did not use a coach because of cost and a perceived lack of necessity. Women ultrarunners in this study were task oriented, internally motivated, health, and financially conscious individuals. With additional information about women ultrarunners, coaches will be better prepared to work with this population and ultrarunners can improve their performance by learning about current participants' practices.

KW - Conditioning

KW - Female distance runners

KW - Female endurance athletes

KW - Long-distance running

KW - Ultraendurance events

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84856134505&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84856134505&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1519/JSC.0b013e318204caa0

DO - 10.1519/JSC.0b013e318204caa0

M3 - Article

VL - 25

SP - 2835

EP - 2842

JO - Strength and Conditioning Journal

JF - Strength and Conditioning Journal

SN - 1524-1602

IS - 10

ER -