Molybdenum Isotope Evidence for Widespread Anoxia in Mid-Proterozoic Oceans

G. L. Arnold, Ariel Anbar, J. Barling, T. W. Lyons

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

How much dissolved oxygen was present in the mid-Proterozoic oceans between 1.8 and 1.0 billion years ago is debated vigorously. One model argues for oxygenation of the oceans soon after the Initial rise of atmospheric oxygen ∼2.3 billion years ago. Recent evidence for H2S in some mid-Proterozoic marine basins suggests, however, that the deep ocean remained anoxic until much later. New molybdenum isotope data from modern and ancient sediments indicate expanded anoxia during the mid-Proterozoic compared to the present-day ocean. Consequently, oxygenation of the deep oceans may have lagged that of the atmosphere by over a billion years.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)87-90
Number of pages4
JournalScience
Volume304
Issue number5667
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Molybdenum
Oceans and Seas
Isotopes
Oxygen
Atmosphere
Hypoxia

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  • General

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Molybdenum Isotope Evidence for Widespread Anoxia in Mid-Proterozoic Oceans. / Arnold, G. L.; Anbar, Ariel; Barling, J.; Lyons, T. W.

In: Science, Vol. 304, No. 5667, 02.04.2004, p. 87-90.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Arnold, G. L. ; Anbar, Ariel ; Barling, J. ; Lyons, T. W. / Molybdenum Isotope Evidence for Widespread Anoxia in Mid-Proterozoic Oceans. In: Science. 2004 ; Vol. 304, No. 5667. pp. 87-90.
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