Abstract

DNA-based self-assembly is a unique method for achieving higher-order molecular architectures made possible by the fact that DNA is a programmable information-coding polymer. In the past decade, two main types of DNA nanostructures have been developed: branch-shaped DNA tiles with small dimensions (commonly up to ∼20 nm) and DNA origami tiles with larger dimensions (up to ∼100 nm). Here we aimed to determine the important factors involved in the assembly of DNA origami superstructures. We constructed a new series of rectangular-shaped DNA origami tiles in which parallel DNA helices are arranged in a zigzag pattern when viewed along the DNA helical axis, a design conceived in order to relax an intrinsic global twist found in the original planar, rectangular origami tiles. Self-associating zigzag tiles were found to form linear arrays in both diagonal directions, while planar tiles showed significant growth in only one direction. Although the series of zigzag tiles were designed to promote two-dimensional array formation, one-dimensional linear arrays and tubular structures were observed instead. We discovered that the dimensional aspect ratio of the origami unit tiles and intertile connection design play important roles in determining the final products, as revealed by atomic force microscopy imaging. This study provides insight into the formation of higher-order structures from self-assembling DNA origami tiles, revealing their unique behavior in comparison with conventional DNA tiles having smaller dimensions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13545-13552
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Chemical Society
Volume132
Issue number38
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 29 2010

Fingerprint

Tile
Self assembly
DNA
Nanostructures
Atomic Force Microscopy
Aspect ratio
Atomic force microscopy
Polymers
Imaging techniques
Growth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Catalysis
  • Biochemistry
  • Colloid and Surface Chemistry

Cite this

Molecular behavior of DNA origami in higher-order self-assembly. / Li, Zhe; Liu, Minghui; Wang, Lei; Nangreave, Jeanette; Yan, Hao; Liu, Yan.

In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, Vol. 132, No. 38, 29.09.2010, p. 13545-13552.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Li, Zhe ; Liu, Minghui ; Wang, Lei ; Nangreave, Jeanette ; Yan, Hao ; Liu, Yan. / Molecular behavior of DNA origami in higher-order self-assembly. In: Journal of the American Chemical Society. 2010 ; Vol. 132, No. 38. pp. 13545-13552.
@article{a3a8553978a4436ab55d43b3015ffbe1,
title = "Molecular behavior of DNA origami in higher-order self-assembly",
abstract = "DNA-based self-assembly is a unique method for achieving higher-order molecular architectures made possible by the fact that DNA is a programmable information-coding polymer. In the past decade, two main types of DNA nanostructures have been developed: branch-shaped DNA tiles with small dimensions (commonly up to ∼20 nm) and DNA origami tiles with larger dimensions (up to ∼100 nm). Here we aimed to determine the important factors involved in the assembly of DNA origami superstructures. We constructed a new series of rectangular-shaped DNA origami tiles in which parallel DNA helices are arranged in a zigzag pattern when viewed along the DNA helical axis, a design conceived in order to relax an intrinsic global twist found in the original planar, rectangular origami tiles. Self-associating zigzag tiles were found to form linear arrays in both diagonal directions, while planar tiles showed significant growth in only one direction. Although the series of zigzag tiles were designed to promote two-dimensional array formation, one-dimensional linear arrays and tubular structures were observed instead. We discovered that the dimensional aspect ratio of the origami unit tiles and intertile connection design play important roles in determining the final products, as revealed by atomic force microscopy imaging. This study provides insight into the formation of higher-order structures from self-assembling DNA origami tiles, revealing their unique behavior in comparison with conventional DNA tiles having smaller dimensions.",
author = "Zhe Li and Minghui Liu and Lei Wang and Jeanette Nangreave and Hao Yan and Yan Liu",
year = "2010",
month = "9",
day = "29",
doi = "10.1021/ja106292x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "132",
pages = "13545--13552",
journal = "Journal of the American Chemical Society",
issn = "0002-7863",
publisher = "American Chemical Society",
number = "38",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Molecular behavior of DNA origami in higher-order self-assembly

AU - Li, Zhe

AU - Liu, Minghui

AU - Wang, Lei

AU - Nangreave, Jeanette

AU - Yan, Hao

AU - Liu, Yan

PY - 2010/9/29

Y1 - 2010/9/29

N2 - DNA-based self-assembly is a unique method for achieving higher-order molecular architectures made possible by the fact that DNA is a programmable information-coding polymer. In the past decade, two main types of DNA nanostructures have been developed: branch-shaped DNA tiles with small dimensions (commonly up to ∼20 nm) and DNA origami tiles with larger dimensions (up to ∼100 nm). Here we aimed to determine the important factors involved in the assembly of DNA origami superstructures. We constructed a new series of rectangular-shaped DNA origami tiles in which parallel DNA helices are arranged in a zigzag pattern when viewed along the DNA helical axis, a design conceived in order to relax an intrinsic global twist found in the original planar, rectangular origami tiles. Self-associating zigzag tiles were found to form linear arrays in both diagonal directions, while planar tiles showed significant growth in only one direction. Although the series of zigzag tiles were designed to promote two-dimensional array formation, one-dimensional linear arrays and tubular structures were observed instead. We discovered that the dimensional aspect ratio of the origami unit tiles and intertile connection design play important roles in determining the final products, as revealed by atomic force microscopy imaging. This study provides insight into the formation of higher-order structures from self-assembling DNA origami tiles, revealing their unique behavior in comparison with conventional DNA tiles having smaller dimensions.

AB - DNA-based self-assembly is a unique method for achieving higher-order molecular architectures made possible by the fact that DNA is a programmable information-coding polymer. In the past decade, two main types of DNA nanostructures have been developed: branch-shaped DNA tiles with small dimensions (commonly up to ∼20 nm) and DNA origami tiles with larger dimensions (up to ∼100 nm). Here we aimed to determine the important factors involved in the assembly of DNA origami superstructures. We constructed a new series of rectangular-shaped DNA origami tiles in which parallel DNA helices are arranged in a zigzag pattern when viewed along the DNA helical axis, a design conceived in order to relax an intrinsic global twist found in the original planar, rectangular origami tiles. Self-associating zigzag tiles were found to form linear arrays in both diagonal directions, while planar tiles showed significant growth in only one direction. Although the series of zigzag tiles were designed to promote two-dimensional array formation, one-dimensional linear arrays and tubular structures were observed instead. We discovered that the dimensional aspect ratio of the origami unit tiles and intertile connection design play important roles in determining the final products, as revealed by atomic force microscopy imaging. This study provides insight into the formation of higher-order structures from self-assembling DNA origami tiles, revealing their unique behavior in comparison with conventional DNA tiles having smaller dimensions.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77957114950&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77957114950&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1021/ja106292x

DO - 10.1021/ja106292x

M3 - Article

C2 - 20825190

AN - SCOPUS:77957114950

VL - 132

SP - 13545

EP - 13552

JO - Journal of the American Chemical Society

JF - Journal of the American Chemical Society

SN - 0002-7863

IS - 38

ER -