Modeling the relationships between discrimination, depression, substance use, and spirituality with Muslims in the United States

David Hodge, Tarek Zidan, Altaf Husain

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Little research has been conducted with Muslims despite the growing size of this population in the United States. This study addresses this gap in the literature by examining the relationship between discrimination and two consequential health outcomes-depression and substance use-in tandem with the protective effects of spirituality on these two outcomes. Drawing from stress and coping theory, a theoretically based model was developed and tested using structural equation modeling with a diverse community sample of Muslims (N = 265). The results indicate that discrimination predicts depression, but not substance use. Spirituality does not function as a mediator but rather exhibits a direct, independent effect on both depression and substance use. The findings underscore the importance of addressing discrimination directed toward Muslims. The results also imply that spirituality may play a critical role in helping Muslims ameliorate depression and substance use in direct practice settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)223-233
Number of pages11
JournalSocial Work Research
Volume39
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

Keywords

  • Depression
  • Discrimination
  • Muslims
  • Spirituality
  • Substance use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science

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