Modeling intrinsic bioremediation for interpret observable biogeochemical footprints of BTEX biodegradation: The need for fermentation and abiotic chemical processes

Max Maurer, Bruce Rittmann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The intrinsic bioremediation of BTEX must be documented by the stoichiometric consumption and production of several other compounds, called 'footprints' of the biodegradation reaction. Although footprints of BTEX biodegradation are easy to identify from reaction stoichiometry, they can be confounded by the stepwise nature of the biodegradation reactions and by several abiotic chemical reactions that also produce or consume the footprints. In order to track the footprints for BTEX biodegradation, the following reactions need to be considered explicitly: (1) fermentation and methanogenesis as separate processes, (2) precipitation and dissolution of calcite, (3) precipitation and dissolution of amorphous iron monosulfide (FeS), (4) conversion of FeS into the thermodynamically stable pyrite (FeS 2) with loss of sulfide and abiotic formation of H 2, and (5) reductive dissolution of solid iron(III) by oxidation of sulfide. We critically review the research that underlies why these mechanisms must be included and how to describe them quantitatively. A companion manuscript develops and applies a mathematical model that includes these reactions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)405-417
Number of pages13
JournalBiodegradation
Volume15
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Chemical Phenomena
Environmental Biodegradation
BTEX
Bioremediation
Sulfides
Biodegradation
chemical process
bioremediation
footprint
Fermentation
fermentation
biodegradation
Iron
Dissolution
Manuscripts
Calcium Carbonate
dissolution
modeling
Theoretical Models
sulfide

Keywords

  • calcite
  • dissolution
  • fermentation
  • footprints
  • intrinsic bioremediation
  • iron reduction
  • methanogenesis
  • natural attenuation
  • precipitation
  • sulfate reduction
  • sulfide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology

Cite this

@article{2870d7a71b114190a1562df5e1ece6ca,
title = "Modeling intrinsic bioremediation for interpret observable biogeochemical footprints of BTEX biodegradation: The need for fermentation and abiotic chemical processes",
abstract = "The intrinsic bioremediation of BTEX must be documented by the stoichiometric consumption and production of several other compounds, called 'footprints' of the biodegradation reaction. Although footprints of BTEX biodegradation are easy to identify from reaction stoichiometry, they can be confounded by the stepwise nature of the biodegradation reactions and by several abiotic chemical reactions that also produce or consume the footprints. In order to track the footprints for BTEX biodegradation, the following reactions need to be considered explicitly: (1) fermentation and methanogenesis as separate processes, (2) precipitation and dissolution of calcite, (3) precipitation and dissolution of amorphous iron monosulfide (FeS), (4) conversion of FeS into the thermodynamically stable pyrite (FeS 2) with loss of sulfide and abiotic formation of H 2, and (5) reductive dissolution of solid iron(III) by oxidation of sulfide. We critically review the research that underlies why these mechanisms must be included and how to describe them quantitatively. A companion manuscript develops and applies a mathematical model that includes these reactions.",
keywords = "calcite, dissolution, fermentation, footprints, intrinsic bioremediation, iron reduction, methanogenesis, natural attenuation, precipitation, sulfate reduction, sulfide",
author = "Max Maurer and Bruce Rittmann",
year = "2004",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1023/B:BIOD.0000044590.23221.b1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "15",
pages = "405--417",
journal = "Biodegradation",
issn = "0923-9820",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Modeling intrinsic bioremediation for interpret observable biogeochemical footprints of BTEX biodegradation

T2 - The need for fermentation and abiotic chemical processes

AU - Maurer, Max

AU - Rittmann, Bruce

PY - 2004/12

Y1 - 2004/12

N2 - The intrinsic bioremediation of BTEX must be documented by the stoichiometric consumption and production of several other compounds, called 'footprints' of the biodegradation reaction. Although footprints of BTEX biodegradation are easy to identify from reaction stoichiometry, they can be confounded by the stepwise nature of the biodegradation reactions and by several abiotic chemical reactions that also produce or consume the footprints. In order to track the footprints for BTEX biodegradation, the following reactions need to be considered explicitly: (1) fermentation and methanogenesis as separate processes, (2) precipitation and dissolution of calcite, (3) precipitation and dissolution of amorphous iron monosulfide (FeS), (4) conversion of FeS into the thermodynamically stable pyrite (FeS 2) with loss of sulfide and abiotic formation of H 2, and (5) reductive dissolution of solid iron(III) by oxidation of sulfide. We critically review the research that underlies why these mechanisms must be included and how to describe them quantitatively. A companion manuscript develops and applies a mathematical model that includes these reactions.

AB - The intrinsic bioremediation of BTEX must be documented by the stoichiometric consumption and production of several other compounds, called 'footprints' of the biodegradation reaction. Although footprints of BTEX biodegradation are easy to identify from reaction stoichiometry, they can be confounded by the stepwise nature of the biodegradation reactions and by several abiotic chemical reactions that also produce or consume the footprints. In order to track the footprints for BTEX biodegradation, the following reactions need to be considered explicitly: (1) fermentation and methanogenesis as separate processes, (2) precipitation and dissolution of calcite, (3) precipitation and dissolution of amorphous iron monosulfide (FeS), (4) conversion of FeS into the thermodynamically stable pyrite (FeS 2) with loss of sulfide and abiotic formation of H 2, and (5) reductive dissolution of solid iron(III) by oxidation of sulfide. We critically review the research that underlies why these mechanisms must be included and how to describe them quantitatively. A companion manuscript develops and applies a mathematical model that includes these reactions.

KW - calcite

KW - dissolution

KW - fermentation

KW - footprints

KW - intrinsic bioremediation

KW - iron reduction

KW - methanogenesis

KW - natural attenuation

KW - precipitation

KW - sulfate reduction

KW - sulfide

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=7044254723&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=7044254723&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1023/B:BIOD.0000044590.23221.b1

DO - 10.1023/B:BIOD.0000044590.23221.b1

M3 - Article

C2 - 15562998

AN - SCOPUS:7044254723

VL - 15

SP - 405

EP - 417

JO - Biodegradation

JF - Biodegradation

SN - 0923-9820

IS - 6

ER -