Mitigation of very-fine and ultra-fine aerosols by vegetation

Thomas Cahill, D. Barnes, E. Fujii, J. Lawton

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Information on the health effects of aerosols has focused renewed attention on the presence of very fine and ultra fine particles from transportation and industrial sources. Almost all diesel and smoking car exhaust mass, as well as PAH, falls into these size ranges. Studies on the removal of sub-micron particles via vegetation were carried out using both the UC Davis Mechanical Engineering wind tunnel and a static diffusion chamber. The source was a standard highway flare, which produces particles of unique composition, and the vegetation was chosen to have needles and leaves year round and high surface areas. Redwood, deodar, live oak, and oleander were chosen, all of which are used near California freeways. Removal rates of above 75% were achieved for redwood and deodar branches, which offered significant options for near source mitigation especially on heavily traveled secondary roads on residential neighborhoods. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 101st AWMA Annual Conference and Exhibition (Portland, OR 6/24-27/2008).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Air and Waste Management Association's Annual Conference and Exhibition, AWMA
Pages2059
Number of pages1
Volume4
StatePublished - 2008
Event101st Air and Waste Management Association Annual Conference and Exhibition 2008 - Portland, OR, United States
Duration: Jun 24 2008Jun 27 2008

Other

Other101st Air and Waste Management Association Annual Conference and Exhibition 2008
CountryUnited States
CityPortland, OR
Period6/24/086/27/08

Fingerprint

Aerosols
mitigation
aerosol
vegetation
Highway systems
Mechanical engineering
Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons
Needles
road
Wind tunnels
Railroad cars
Health
motorway
smoking
wind tunnel
range size
diesel
automobile
PAH
surface area

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Energy(all)

Cite this

Cahill, T., Barnes, D., Fujii, E., & Lawton, J. (2008). Mitigation of very-fine and ultra-fine aerosols by vegetation. In Proceedings of the Air and Waste Management Association's Annual Conference and Exhibition, AWMA (Vol. 4, pp. 2059)

Mitigation of very-fine and ultra-fine aerosols by vegetation. / Cahill, Thomas; Barnes, D.; Fujii, E.; Lawton, J.

Proceedings of the Air and Waste Management Association's Annual Conference and Exhibition, AWMA. Vol. 4 2008. p. 2059.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Cahill, T, Barnes, D, Fujii, E & Lawton, J 2008, Mitigation of very-fine and ultra-fine aerosols by vegetation. in Proceedings of the Air and Waste Management Association's Annual Conference and Exhibition, AWMA. vol. 4, pp. 2059, 101st Air and Waste Management Association Annual Conference and Exhibition 2008, Portland, OR, United States, 6/24/08.
Cahill T, Barnes D, Fujii E, Lawton J. Mitigation of very-fine and ultra-fine aerosols by vegetation. In Proceedings of the Air and Waste Management Association's Annual Conference and Exhibition, AWMA. Vol. 4. 2008. p. 2059
Cahill, Thomas ; Barnes, D. ; Fujii, E. ; Lawton, J. / Mitigation of very-fine and ultra-fine aerosols by vegetation. Proceedings of the Air and Waste Management Association's Annual Conference and Exhibition, AWMA. Vol. 4 2008. pp. 2059
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