Micropattern effect on breast cancer cells behavior on isotropically etched silicon microenvironments

Mehdi Nikkhah, Jeannine S. Strobl, Bhanu Peddi, Adedamola Omotosho, Masoud Agah

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

In this paper we are investigating three dimensional (3-D) silicon-based microenvironments as potential platforms for breast cancer diagnostics. We have developed isotropically etched microstructures with a wide range of geometrical patterns for this purpose. Our results indicate that with the etched surface ratio of ∼65%, it is possible to capture 80-90% of the cancer cells within each silicon chip. After treatment of the cells with mitomycin C (to block the cell growth) more number of the cells are trapped inside the etched features for longer cultures times (72 h) suggesting that there is a directed motility and attraction of the cells toward the etched cavities and by optimally designing the etched features, the proposed platforms can be potentially used for diagnostics purposes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the ASME 1st Global Congress on NanoEngineering for Medicine and Biology 2010, NEMB2010
PublisherASME
Pages115-116
Number of pages2
ISBN (Print)9780791843925
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010
Externally publishedYes
Event1st Global Congress on NanoEngineering for Medicine and Biology: Advancing Health Care through NanoEngineering and Computing, NEMB 2010 - Houston, TX, United States
Duration: Feb 7 2010Feb 10 2010

Publication series

NameProceedings of the ASME 1st Global Congress on NanoEngineering for Medicine and Biology 2010, NEMB2010

Other

Other1st Global Congress on NanoEngineering for Medicine and Biology: Advancing Health Care through NanoEngineering and Computing, NEMB 2010
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityHouston, TX
Period2/7/102/10/10

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Medicine(all)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Micropattern effect on breast cancer cells behavior on isotropically etched silicon microenvironments'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this