Microgravity as a novel environmental signal affecting Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium virulence

Cheryl Nickerson, C. Mark Ott, Sarah J. Mister, Brian J. Morrow, Lisa Burns-Keliher, Duane L. Pierson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

135 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effects of spaceflight on the infectious disease process have only been studied at the level of the host immune response and indicate a blunting of the immune mechanism in humans and animals. Accordingly, it is necessary to assess potential changes in microbial virulence associated with spaceflight which may impact the probability of in-flight infectious disease. In this study, we investigated the effect of altered gravitational vectors on Salmonella virulence in mice. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium grown under modeled microgravity (MMG) were more virulent and were recovered in higher numbers from the murine spleen and liver following oral infection compared to organisms grown under normal gravity. Furthermore, MMG-grown salmonellae were more resistant to acid stress and macrophage killing and exhibited significant differences in protein synthesis than did normal- gravity-grown cells. Our results indicate that the environment created by simulated microgravity represents a novel environmental regulatory factor of Salmonella virulence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3147-3152
Number of pages6
JournalInfection and Immunity
Volume68
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Weightlessness
Salmonella enterica
Salmonella
Virulence
Space Flight
Gravitation
Communicable Diseases
Virulence Factors
Spleen
Macrophages
Acids
Liver
Infection
Serogroup
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Microgravity as a novel environmental signal affecting Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium virulence. / Nickerson, Cheryl; Mark Ott, C.; Mister, Sarah J.; Morrow, Brian J.; Burns-Keliher, Lisa; Pierson, Duane L.

In: Infection and Immunity, Vol. 68, No. 6, 06.2000, p. 3147-3152.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nickerson, Cheryl ; Mark Ott, C. ; Mister, Sarah J. ; Morrow, Brian J. ; Burns-Keliher, Lisa ; Pierson, Duane L. / Microgravity as a novel environmental signal affecting Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium virulence. In: Infection and Immunity. 2000 ; Vol. 68, No. 6. pp. 3147-3152.
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