Abstract

A fluidic device capable of aspirating microparticles in aqueous medium and transporting them under controlled conditions to a chosen destination is reported. The device is fabricated through repeated stacking of aligned, laser cut acrylic, mylar and adhesive layers. The rectangular cross-section of the primary flow chamber within the device follows a specific mathematical function to achieve a desired velocity profile for improved particle tracking. Flow is controlled into and out of the chamber by three-way solenoid valves to allow changes in flow direction and to minimize capacitance in the fluidic circuit. The valves are connected to syringe pumps which generate positive and negative pressures within the device. Aspirated microparticles can be accurately transported by controlling the ON/OFF state of the solenoid valves. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models are employed to compare the theoretically derived velocity field and pressure distributions with analytical solutions and observations. Processed imagery showed the positions versus time of microparticle flowing through the chamber channel.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition 2009, IMECE 2009
PublisherAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
Pages2213-2220
Number of pages8
EditionPART C
ISBN (Print)9780791843826
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010
EventASME 2009 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE2009 - Lake Buena Vista, FL, United States
Duration: Nov 13 2009Nov 19 2009

Publication series

NameASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, Proceedings
NumberPART C
Volume9

Other

OtherASME 2009 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE2009
CountryUnited States
CityLake Buena Vista, FL
Period11/13/0911/19/09

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mechanical Engineering

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  • Cite this

    Merza, S. A., Posner, J. D., Anis, Y. H., Young, A. C., Johnson, R. H., & Meldrum, D. (2010). Microfluidic device for transport and observation of single cells. In Proceedings of the ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition 2009, IMECE 2009 (PART C ed., pp. 2213-2220). (ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, Proceedings; Vol. 9, No. PART C). American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). https://doi.org/10.1115/IMECE2009-13019