Mexican-origin parents' latent occupational profiles: Associations with parent-youth relationships and youth aspirations

Lorey A. Wheeler, Kimberly Updegraff, Adriana Umaña-Taylor, Jenn-Yun Tein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study used an ecological, person-centered approach to identify subgroups of families who had similar profiles across multiple dimensions of Mexican-origin mothers' and fathers' occupational characteristics (i.e., self-direction, hazardous conditions, physical activity) and to relate these subgroups to families' sociocultural characteristics and youth adjustment. The study included 160 dual-earner Mexican-origin families from the urban Southwest. Mothers' and fathers' objective work characteristics and families' sociocultural characteristics were assessed when youth were in early to middle adolescence; adjustment was assessed during late adolescence and early adulthood for 2 offspring in each family. A latent profile analysis identified 3 profiles that evidenced distinct patterns of occupational characteristics: a differentiated high physical activity profile characterized by high levels of physical activity and low levels of self-direction; an incongruent profile characterized by large differences between parents on self-direction, hazards, and physical activity; and a congruent highly self-directed profile characterized by congruence across parents on occupational characteristics. These profiles were linked to sociocultural characteristics (i.e., family income, educational attainment, and acculturation) and to relational adjustment (i.e., mother- and father-youth conflict, father warmth) and educational aspirations. Results are discussed with respect to implications of parents' work for youths' future family relationships and attainment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)772-783
Number of pages12
JournalDevelopmental psychology
Volume50
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2014

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Keywords

  • Aspirations
  • Late adolescence/early adulthood
  • Mexican-origin families
  • Parent-youth relationships
  • Parental work

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Demography
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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