Mexican American adolescents' perceptions of dating violence programs: Recommendations for effective program design and implementation

Lela Williams, Heidi L. Adams, Bianca N. Altamirano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although promising dating violence programs have emerged, little is known about their effectiveness for Mexican American youth, a vulnerable and understudied population. The purpose of this study was: (1) to offer culturally-grounded recommendations towards the development of effective Teen Dating Violence (TDV) programs and/or the modification of existing programs, and (2) to identify potential barriers to Mexican American youth's participation in TDV programs. Using the perspectives of Mexican American youth (15 to 17 years old) and a phenomenological study design, focus groups (N = 14) were conducted that were homogeneous by gender and level of acculturation (low/bicultural/high). Youth provided recommendations for program design (i.e. Design it to explore between-group and within-group cultural variability, Design it to be broad in scope, and Keep it positive) and program implementation (i.e. Make the program fun and non-threatening, and Involve peers, couples, and individuals) within the context of acculturation. Adolescents' suggestion of a program delivered in smaller groups that support sharing within peer relationships may stem from a desire for intimacy within close relationships - re-creating a sense of familismo. Teen dating violence programs best meets the needs of Mexican American adolescents by including programmatic components that are grounded in personalized cultural values.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)395-411
Number of pages17
JournalQualitative Social Work
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2012

Fingerprint

violence
adolescent
Acculturation
acculturation
Intimate Partner Violence
Group
Vulnerable Populations
intimacy
Focus Groups
small group
participation
gender
Values

Keywords

  • culture
  • domestic violence
  • latino
  • prevention
  • young people

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Mexican American adolescents' perceptions of dating violence programs : Recommendations for effective program design and implementation. / Williams, Lela; Adams, Heidi L.; Altamirano, Bianca N.

In: Qualitative Social Work, Vol. 11, No. 4, 07.2012, p. 395-411.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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