Metropolitan areas as redistributors of population( USA).

C. C. Roseman, Kevin McHugh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is argued that the spatial patterns of place-ties collectively held by potential metropolitan-to-nonmetropolitan migrants are broader than those held by potential nonmetropolitan-to- metropolitan migrants. Consistent with this argument, it is hypothesized that metropolitan migration fields are asymmetrical, ie. out-migration fields are more cosmopolitan than in-migration fields for the period 1965-1970 within the US. The hypothesis is accepted generally, and the asymmetry is found to be greatest for the largest metropolitan areas, some of which were also experiencing net out-migration during the period. It is concluded that the micro-level concept of place-ties and the macro-level concept of migration fields are important inputs to the understanding of population redistribution patterns.-Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)22-33
Number of pages12
JournalUrban Geography
Volume3
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1982
Externally publishedYes

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metropolitan area
agglomeration area
out-migration
migration
migrant
macro level
micro level
redistribution
asymmetry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Urban Studies

Cite this

Metropolitan areas as redistributors of population( USA). / Roseman, C. C.; McHugh, Kevin.

In: Urban Geography, Vol. 3, No. 1, 1982, p. 22-33.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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