Metal composition of fine particulate air pollution and acute changes in cardiorespiratory physiology

Sabit Cakmak, Robert Dales, Lisa Marie Kauri, Mamun Mahmud, Keith Van Ryswyk, Jennifer Vanos, Ling Liu, Premkumari Kumarathasan, Errol Thomson, Renaud Vincent, Scott Weichenthal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

72 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Studying the physiologic effects of components of fine particulate mass (PM2.5) could contribute to a better understanding of the nature of toxicity of air pollution. Objectives We examined the relation between acute changes in cardiovascular and respiratory function, and PM 2.5-associated-metals. Methods Using generalized linear mixed models, daily changes in ambient PM2.5-associated metals were compared to daily changes in physiologic measures in 59 healthy subjects who spent 5-days near a steel plant and 5-days on a college campus. Results Interquartile increases in calcium, cadmium, lead, strontium, tin, vanadium and zinc were associated with statistically significant increases in heart rate of 1-3 beats per minute, increases of 1-3 mmHg in blood pressure and/or lung function decreases of up to 4% for total lung capacity. Conclusion Metals contained in PM2.5 were found to be associated with acute changes in cardiovascular and respiratory physiology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)208-214
Number of pages7
JournalEnvironmental Pollution
Volume189
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Air Pollution
Physiology
Air pollution
Metals
Chemical analysis
Respiratory Physiological Phenomena
Cardiovascular Physiological Phenomena
Total Lung Capacity
Vanadium
Strontium
Iron and steel plants
Tin
Steel
Blood pressure
Cadmium
Toxicity
Zinc
Calcium
Linear Models
Healthy Volunteers

Keywords

  • Air pollution
  • Epidemiology
  • Fine particulate air pollution
  • Metals
  • Steel production

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology
  • Pollution
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Metal composition of fine particulate air pollution and acute changes in cardiorespiratory physiology. / Cakmak, Sabit; Dales, Robert; Kauri, Lisa Marie; Mahmud, Mamun; Van Ryswyk, Keith; Vanos, Jennifer; Liu, Ling; Kumarathasan, Premkumari; Thomson, Errol; Vincent, Renaud; Weichenthal, Scott.

In: Environmental Pollution, Vol. 189, 06.2014, p. 208-214.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cakmak, S, Dales, R, Kauri, LM, Mahmud, M, Van Ryswyk, K, Vanos, J, Liu, L, Kumarathasan, P, Thomson, E, Vincent, R & Weichenthal, S 2014, 'Metal composition of fine particulate air pollution and acute changes in cardiorespiratory physiology', Environmental Pollution, vol. 189, pp. 208-214. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2014.03.004
Cakmak, Sabit ; Dales, Robert ; Kauri, Lisa Marie ; Mahmud, Mamun ; Van Ryswyk, Keith ; Vanos, Jennifer ; Liu, Ling ; Kumarathasan, Premkumari ; Thomson, Errol ; Vincent, Renaud ; Weichenthal, Scott. / Metal composition of fine particulate air pollution and acute changes in cardiorespiratory physiology. In: Environmental Pollution. 2014 ; Vol. 189. pp. 208-214.
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AU - Vanos, Jennifer

AU - Liu, Ling

AU - Kumarathasan, Premkumari

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