Metabolic syndrome and risk of cancer mortality in men

Jason R. Jaggers, Xuemei Sui, Steven P. Hooker, Michael J. LaMonte, Charles E. Matthews, Gregory A. Hand, Steven N. Blair

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

72 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been linked with an increased risk of developing cancer; however, the association between MetS and cancer mortality remains less clear. Little research has focused on pre-cancer risk factors that may affect the outcome of treatment. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between MetS and all-cancer mortality in men. Methods: The participants included 33,230 men aged 20-88 years who were enrolled in the Aerobics Centre Longitudinal Study and who were free of known cancer at the baseline. Results: At baseline 28% of all the participants had MetS. During an average of 14 years follow-up, there were a total of 685 deaths due to cancer. MetS at baseline was associated with a 56% greater age-adjusted risk in cancer mortality. Conclusion: These data show that MetS is associated with an increased risk of all-cause cancer mortality in men. Based on these findings, it is evident that successful interventions should be identified to attenuate the negative effects of MetS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1831-1838
Number of pages8
JournalEuropean Journal of Cancer
Volume45
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Mortality
Neoplasms
Longitudinal Studies
Research

Keywords

  • Colorectal cancer
  • Dyslipidaemia
  • Epidemiology
  • Hypertension
  • Insulin resistance
  • Lung cancer
  • Obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Jaggers, J. R., Sui, X., Hooker, S. P., LaMonte, M. J., Matthews, C. E., Hand, G. A., & Blair, S. N. (2009). Metabolic syndrome and risk of cancer mortality in men. European Journal of Cancer, 45(10), 1831-1838. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejca.2009.01.031

Metabolic syndrome and risk of cancer mortality in men. / Jaggers, Jason R.; Sui, Xuemei; Hooker, Steven P.; LaMonte, Michael J.; Matthews, Charles E.; Hand, Gregory A.; Blair, Steven N.

In: European Journal of Cancer, Vol. 45, No. 10, 07.2009, p. 1831-1838.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jaggers, JR, Sui, X, Hooker, SP, LaMonte, MJ, Matthews, CE, Hand, GA & Blair, SN 2009, 'Metabolic syndrome and risk of cancer mortality in men', European Journal of Cancer, vol. 45, no. 10, pp. 1831-1838. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejca.2009.01.031
Jaggers JR, Sui X, Hooker SP, LaMonte MJ, Matthews CE, Hand GA et al. Metabolic syndrome and risk of cancer mortality in men. European Journal of Cancer. 2009 Jul;45(10):1831-1838. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejca.2009.01.031
Jaggers, Jason R. ; Sui, Xuemei ; Hooker, Steven P. ; LaMonte, Michael J. ; Matthews, Charles E. ; Hand, Gregory A. ; Blair, Steven N. / Metabolic syndrome and risk of cancer mortality in men. In: European Journal of Cancer. 2009 ; Vol. 45, No. 10. pp. 1831-1838.
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