Merging genomes with geochemistry in hydrothermal ecosystems

Anna Louise Reysenbach, Everett Shock

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

194 Scopus citations

Abstract

Thermophilic microbial inhabitants of active seafloor and continental hot springs populate the deepest branches of the universal phylogenetic tree, making hydrothermal ecosystems the most ancient continuously inhabited ecosystems on Earth. Geochemical consequences of hot water-rock interactions render these environments habitable and supply a diverse array of energy sources. Clues to the strategies for how life thrives in these dynamic ecosystems are beginning to be elucidated through a confluence of biogeochemistry, microbiology, ecology, molecular biology, and genomics. These efforts have the potential to reveal how ecosystems originate, the extent of the subsurface biosphere, and the driving forces of evolution.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1077-1082
Number of pages6
JournalScience
Volume296
Issue number5570
DOIs
StatePublished - May 10 2002

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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