Mental health conditions and academic burnout among medical and non-medical undergraduates during the mitigation of COVID-19 pandemic in China

Qian Yang, Yueheng Liu, Winson Fuzun Yang, Pu Peng, Shubao Chen, Yunfei Wang, Xin Wang, Manyun Li, Yingying Wang, Yuzhu Hao, Li He, Qianjin Wang, Junhong Zhang, Yuejiao Ma, Haoyu He, Yanan Zhou, Jiang Long, Chang Qi, Yi Yuan Tang, Yanhui LiaoJinsong Tang, Qiuxia Wu, Tieqiao Liu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The outbreak of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has posed a great impact on people’s mental health, especially for undergraduate students. This study aimed to compare the mental health conditions and academic burnout between medical and non-medical undergraduates in China when the COVID-19 pandemic is mitigating. A cross-sectional online survey was conducted among 4,972 undergraduates between October 2020 and April 2021, when the pandemic was basically under control. The survey included basic demographics information and standardized scales to evaluate depression, anxiety, perceived stress, daytime sleepiness, alcohol abuse/dependence, quality of life, fatigue, and academic burnout. Compared with medical undergraduates, non-medical undergraduates had higher rates of moderate to severe depression symptoms (29.1% vs. 17.9%, P < 0.001), moderate to severe anxiety symptoms (19.7% vs. 8.9%, P < 0.001), alcohol abuse/dependence (16.3% vs.10.3%, P < 0.001), excessive daytime sleepiness (47.4% vs. 43.4%, P = 0.018), high perceived stress (34.7% vs. 22.2%, P < 0.001), high level of fatigue (51.8% vs. 42.2%, P < 0.001), low QOL (35.8% vs. 21.4%, P < 0.001), and higher academic burnout score (59.4 vs. 57.5, P < 0.001). Being non-medical undergraduates, depression, alcohol abuse/dependence, excessive daytime sleepiness, and high perceived stress were positively associated with academic burnout, while high QOL was negatively associated with the burnout (all P < 0.001). Excessive daytime sleepiness was the strongest predictor for academic burnout.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)57851-57859
Number of pages9
JournalEnvironmental Science and Pollution Research
Volume29
Issue number38
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2022

Keywords

  • Academic burnout
  • COVID-19 pandemic
  • Mental health conditions
  • Undergraduate students

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Pollution
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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